Read For Success: 4 Reads for your Career

Following on from our previous Read for Success blogs, we take a look at Career Development – something every professional continuously strives for. These books offer up fantastic insight into how you can develop your career further.

The Profits Principles: The practical guide to building an extraordinary business around doing what you loveCareer Development

Easy-to-digest, a passion driven book for all business professionals looking to develop their career. Steven Briginshaw writes about the step by step processes to help turn your passion and love for what you do, into something sustainable, profitable and fun. Logical with a sense of confidence, this book hits the spot!

Who should read this book: aimed towards anyone and everyone looking to find the meaning of how to turn your career and business dreams into a reality.

This book has been rated: 5 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Career DevelopementThe Business of Sharing: Making it in the New Sharing Economy

With businesses rapidly expanding, we introduce this wonderful read for a budding entrepreneur. This book contains some personal anecdotes, often comical at times, from Alex Stephany about he’s personal experience getting to grips withing the sharing economy.

Who should read this book: those who want to learning  the importance of the growing economy.

This book has been rated: 5 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Eat That Frog!: Get More of the Important Things Done – Today! career development

A motivational read for anyone keen on successfully managing their time. The bite sized lessons contained in the book can be used in everyday work environment to help you manage your time better and approach projects more efficiently. It’s hard to believe that a self-help book can teach you techniques that you didn’t already know. And whilst some of these techniques can be obvious facts and standard clichés about telling yourself “You can do better”, Brian Tracy really proves he’s positive message works in this excellent motivational book.

Who should read this book: those who have hit a career barrier or looking for motivation for better time management within their career

 This book has been rated: 4.5 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Career DevelopmentOne Minute Salesperson

Whether you’ve just started in sales or you’re at the top of you game, the One Minute Salesperson cuts straight to the point. Simply put, be friendly and ask the right questions and you will sell. This is an excellent read with some great insights on how to solve management and business related problems.

Who should read this book: a salesperson in or going into managerial level looking to develop.

This book has been rated: 4.3 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

What Future Job Skills will be needed to survive in a Machine automated world?

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are the buzzwords of the moment. We hear about self-driving cars and a world of automation where chatbots run call centres and respond to customer queries. Much of this technology is new to the marketplace, but predictions are that these are only the start of things to come. So where does that leave people just entering the job market? What future career prospects will our children have, and how can we prepare them to have the future job skills needed to survive in a machine dominated future?

The difference between Humans and Machines

There are many things that machines can do much better than humans, like search vast volumes of data and make mathematical calculations. But their abilities are governed by one major factor – rules. Machines work on programming and predictive learning based on historical data. If new factors come into to the mix, they are ill equipped to manage them.

Humans on the other hand are highly adaptable and can apply knowledge creatively to find solutions to new problems. This type of problem solving ability is what will be the key to humans continuing to add value in the workplace. As much as we’d like to think modern lifestyles are easy to control, plan for and schedule, there remains a high level of unpredictability to life. In addition there are many work sectors in which it will be hard to replace humans with machines. These are the things to be taken into consideration when teaching our children future job skills.

Future Job Skills lie in Human Value:
There are several types of jobs that require strong interpersonal skills and this is not something that machines can’t easily mimic. Think of social professions such as psychology or emergency services, for example.

In the event of an accident, natural disaster or fire, no one can fully understand the situation until they arrive on scene. Additionally as the situation unfolds, circumstances can change. Patients may respond well to treatment or not, what was a stable and safe environment on arrival can quickly become unsafe. Only humans can effectively manage such circumstances because they have the knowledge and instinct to be able to make decisions and adapt according to the circumstances. This highlights an important future job skill: The ability to think on your feet and adapt knowledge and decision making to changing circumstances.

A second important future job skill is visualisation and planning – the ability to create perspective, design, create and coordinate ideas so that they become reality. Architects, engineers, even graphic designers and advertising agencies require human creativity and this is a skill worth developing. Machines may be able to take over many tasks, but it is still human thinking that envisioned them doing that in the first place. Creativity, design, and engineering are important future job skills that humans do best.

Nature and nurture – there is a limit to how much we (or machines) can control the natural world and because of that there will always be opportunities for humans to step in and make a Future job skillsdifference. The environment remains constantly in flux. One only has to view the ever changing weather patterns to see that. As much as we’d like to use equipment to predict what will happen, in the end, nature remains unpredictably in control.

Careers involved in the environmental sector will rely on human expertise from conservation, through to legal management and control as well as the field of medicine. Despite advances, new bugs and diseases consistently appear and old viruses re-emerge, stronger than ever. The human body responds individually to treatments with emotional and mental influences proving to be just as important as physiological factors. As a result, humans will remain valuable in the field of natural sciences. Related future job skills may include scientific knowledge and study, social skills, legal skills as well as management and understanding all varieties of interlinked ecosystems.

Business and economics is another field that remains largely unpredictable. While markets may be manipulated and influenced, consumers react of their own accord, and because they are human the outcomes can never truly be certain. Take last year’s Brexit vote for example. Nobody thought the result would be “no”, and economic predictions based on that result were ominous. Yet many of those fears have proven to be unfounded. While certain sectors took a knock, others have shown to be resilient, growing exponentially despite conservative economic movements. Business thinking, particularly in the entrepreneurial realm will remain important future job skills, as well as that of managers, analysts and economists.

In the future there will be many opportunities to work with machines to achieve better outcomes, and there will also be careers and areas of expertise that will remain firmly in human hands. Rather than fear machines and the impact they may have, the most important future job skills may involve using instinctive human potential to think creatively and seek out opportunities even where there appear to only be challenges.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Take control of your own Personal Development

As new generations enter the workforce, many jobseekers look for work opportunities in companies that will help with their own personal development. But whose responsibility is this really? Is itHuman Capital Management personal development up to employers to provide training or should individuals be taking the initiative if they want to progress in their career?

In terms of Human Capital Management, business are recognising that they do have an important role to play. When they invest in their staff and create a stimulating work environment, it helps to reduce attrition and increases employee engagement which often results in greater productivity. This helps them to retain and develop top talent that contributes to the company success. So it is in a company’s interests to provide training and career development opportunities.

The Development Dilemma

The problem is that often employees will complete the training and gain the benefit from it and then move on elsewhere, so the money and time invested in those employees is benefiting someone else and not the company who provided the training. This dilemma results in companies being selective on who they provide training to, often choosing to invest in employees that show themselves to be proactive and interested in adding more value to the business as well as their own personal development.

One method that companies are in investing in terms of human capital management is gamification. This incorporates self-directed learning into a gaming type platform. It allows employees to create their own persona online, register for and complete training in their own time and gain recognition for their efforts. It’s proving to be a valuable tool because those employees that are really invested in personal development have the opportunity to complete additional training modules and further their own knowledge while at the same time encouraging others to do the same by their example.

But what if the company you work for does not provide these opportunities, or limits them to a select few senior staff? How can you progress in your personal development so that you’re consistently building your career? Here are our top 3 tips:

Set Goals and Objectives

Give some thought as to where you want to me in the short, medium and long term. What type of Human Capital Management role to do you see yourself fulfilling in 5-10 year’s time or by the end of the year? What are the stepping stones to get there? What skills or type of experience will you need and how can you accomplish that?

Asking these questions will help you set clear goals and personal objectives. Remember too, the golden rules of goal setting: Goals should be specific, measurable, action-oriented, reasonable and time-based. Start with weekly goals, setting milestones that are a starting point to reach your long term human capital management goals.

Breaking bigger goals into bite sized chunks not only helps to keep you on track, it’s also extremely rewarding to tick off tasks. It gives you a sense of accomplishment which encourages you to keep moving towards your bigger personal development goals.

Coaching and Mentoring

Find someone who can mentor you and don’t underestimate the value of this. If you have some budget available you may want to invest in a personal or business coach. However, keep in mind that this is the type of relationship that will develop over time and could get quite costly if you choose to have regular weekly or monthly meet up sessions. A coach is someone who is trained (and certified) to help guide you in making decisions and helping you uncover what’s most important to you so that you can then direct your personal development efforts into specific areas of your life.

Mentoring on the other hand may be offered free of charge in an organisation or on an industry forum. This is where more senior people freely give of their time and input and are there to listen to your questions and provide advice based on their personal experience. This could be a senior colleague, manager or even director in the firm.

Keep in mind that a mentor needn’t be someone you meet with in person. You could connect with someone in your industry online and have video chats as mentoring sessions, or have a set up where you can communicate over email or chat.

Finally, there is also the option of reading inspirational stories and books by leading business and industry personalities. These books can provide valuable insights on how they achieved success that you can incorporate into your personal development and goal setting.

Beat the Imposter Phenomenon

Many people don’t progress in their careers, not because they don’t have the skills and abilities, but rather because they don’t believe in themselves. They live with a sense that they’re an imposter and soon someone will find out that they aren’t all they’re supposed to be. Part of personal development is recognising your skills and value you can contribute to a business. Believe in yourself and that you’re worth investing in, because if you do, others will too.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

So…tell me about yourself?

Jobseekers talking about themselvesIt may seem an obvious question for an interview but it’s one that most jobseekers dread. “What should I share? How much should I share? If I talk about myself too much I may come across as arrogant. If I don’t share enough they will think I lack confidence.”

I’m often surprised how unprepared jobseekers are for this question. Maybe because it is so broad and they aren’t quite sure where to start. So here’s my tip: Think marketing. Think of yourself as a product that you need to present in a way that makes the other person sit up and think “Hey that’s exactly what I need!”

Here are some marketing questions to help you prepare your answers:

Who am I? (Personality)
Often personality is as much a factor as skills or experience in finding the person that is the right fit for a team. With this question you want to be sharing your values and what’s important to you. Things like being a good team member or leader, someone who likes to creatively solve problems or enjoys collaborating. Think about what the interviewer might be looking for in a jobseeker and align that with your strongest personality traits.

What is my experience? (Background)
Your past work and life experience creates a backdrop for the rest of your marketing story. This is where you can highlight key projects you worked on and what you enjoyed most about them. Be sure to highlight specific challenges faced and how they were overcome. Travel, hobbies and interests can also be featured here as they will provide a broader view of your life experience.

What am I good at? (Features)
As a jobseeker you need to showcase what you can do in terms of specific skills so that the interviewer can tick the boxes if you align with what they are looking for. Be specific and link your skills to your experience to demonstrate that you really do know what you’re talking about.

What have I achieved? (Benefits)
For every skill or feature you list about yourself, link it to a benefit for the employer – either past or future. For example: “By streamlining the project rollout, implementation was achieved in 3 months instead of 5 months saving the company X amount in implementation costs.” Always think in terms of: “What’s in it for them?” because this is what will get their attention.

What do I want? (Mutual benefits)
Interviewers are interested in what jobseekers are looking for because this is a big factor in how long they will stay with the company. Be honest in your expectations, but make sure they are grounded in reality. Link your expectations into why you applied for the position and want to work for the company. If you show that you are sold on the company and eager to contribute you are already half way into marketing yourself into the job.

As a final tip, keep in mind the perspective of the interviewer and market yourself to them. (What are they looking for, what do they want?) This will help prevent you getting too self-conscious when trying to talk about yourself. Put yourself forward as not just a jobseeker, but someone they really can’t afford to be without.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Is Wellbeing in the Workplace On Your Agenda? #Itshouldbe

Workplace wellbeing is an area that’s receiving significant focus in today’s business environment, primarily from companies who are eager to improve corporate culture and employee performance. Of course, there’s more to a comprehensive wellbeing program, than filling a fruit bowl in the company kitchen or giving staff free gym memberships.

Today, if organisations want to truly implement holistic wellbeing into the workforce, and reap the benefits of a happy workplace, then they need to focus on physical, emotional, and mental wellbeing as a combined concern.

After all, the Corporate Leadership Council reports that while lost employees can cost as much as 150% of that employee’s salary. On the other hand, engaged and motivated employees can reduce staff turnover by up to 87%!

Investment in the right wellbeing programmes can deliver incredible outcomes for both employee productivity, and brand health. From better talent retention to reduced absenteeism, it’s easy to see why today’s businesses are putting wellbeing first.


Wellbeing is Key to Employee Motivation

Happy, motivated employees are productive employees. That’s why good wellbeing approaches are a common factor of companies that span various shapes and sizes. One UK high-street retailer, Richer Sounds, noted that their aim in business is to help their employees better serve customers. In order to do that, they need to know that their team is fully supported, in both their business and personal lives.

Richer Sounds implement a range of wellbeing initiatives designed to give their professionals peace of mind.

For instance, one percent of the company’s annual profits go into a “hardship fund”, while medical referrals, free use of company holiday homes, counselling services, and gym memberships are all offered as standard. The outcome is a better level of motivation throughout the workforce.

The golden rule of employee motivation is letting your staff know that they’re your most valuable asset. After all, without them, you couldn’t get much done in your business. If employees believe that their employers care about them, they’ll be more dedicated and loyal to that brand.

Wellbeing, Company Culture, and Brand Health

By giving employees the opportunity to better manage their health and wellbeing, companies aren’t only encouraging happier, more devoted team members; wellbeing initiatives can also help to highlight the most attractive characteristics of a brand, and therefore engage new talent in the workforce.

“Brand health” is an important feature of workplace wellness programs that successful companies are developing. It represents the ability of a brand to retain their key talent, and draw new skills into the workplace when positions open.

A healthy brand attracts the best possible applicants, as todays talent is no longer searching only for high salariesand good bonuses. Modern employees want work/life balance, respect in the office, and benefits that focus on their needs.

Organisations that can show how much they value their people are more likely to create environments where staff are truly dedicated to their employers. If the business you work for demonstrates that it’s willing to go the extra mile to keep you happy, then the chances are that you’ll be prepared to show the same imitative for your business.

Of course, for wellbeing to emerge as a dominant element of company culture, and a sign of good brand health, it’s important to ensure that approaches align authentically with the core purposes of the business. A successful strategy needs to consider the features involved in authentic, inspirational leadership and a supportive working culture.


Implementing Wellbeing: It’s Easier Than You Think

Although the concept of a customised wellbeing programme can seem a little daunting, the truth is that it’s not as overwhelming as it appears. Often, it’s simply a matter of planning for success, by considering the needs and desires of your workforce. For instance, try following these steps:

1. Decide what you want your employee wellbeing programme to achieve.

A positive employee wellbeing programme begins by recognising that “wellbeing” means different things to different people. You need to make sure that your programme covers concepts like mental health, physical health, emotion, and support for your staff. Pin down what you mean by “employee wellness” and build from there.

 

2. Identify gaps in employee wellness.

If you can see clear areas where staff aren’t getting the support they need, you can start to implement a strategy that fills those gaps and simplifies the wellbeing process for your company. At the same time, you can to link your wellbeing initiative to the strategic goals of your business, for a more measurable return on investment.

 

3. Encourage executives to buy in.

For an employee wellbeing programme to thrive, senior management needs to buy in to the process. The people that lead your company are the ones that inspire other employees into action. If your CEO can lead by example, adoption for your wellbeing solution will thrive.

 

4. Have some fun.

Remember that health and wellbeing doesn’t have to be a chore, it can be a positive way to inspire change. Help employees to enjoy their wellbeing programmes by getting them to take part in games and challenges for quick rewards.

 

5. Measure and Evaluate.

Finally, remember to appraise your wellbeing programme regularly. Check what’s going well for your company, and what might be facing challenges, and make changes where necessary. As your business evolves, your wellbeing solution might evolve with it too.

 

About Resource On Demand

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

 

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Preventing Salesforce Career Stagnation

The traditional model of career progression was: learn as skill, get a job, get promoted, become a manager, then keep that job until you retire. The problem with that is that not only does it limit opportunities, but it’s also a fast recipe for stagnation. If you’re only developing skills and experience in one specific Salesforce niche, chances are at some point you’ll get bored, but with no option for upward progression you may feel stuck. And this is especially an issue when industries or technologies start to mature.

In the UK, Salesforce is starting to reach a level of maturity. Have you considered that maybe it’s time to move on and gain some fresh experience to prevent career stagnation? Despite what you may think, the best careers are those that are not linear. It’s not always about moving up, sometimes a side step or even a backwards step is the best career move you can make because it can lead to new and often better opportunities. Here are our three top tips for preventing career stagnation:

1. Always be learning

This goes far beyond the basics of fulfilling a Salesforce job in terms of development, integration or coding. When you are conscious about learning you are always on the lookout for opportunities to do so, and this in itself is what opens many doors. Even a lunch time chat with a junior colleague may highlight an area they are struggling with. It can plant an idea, open up an opportunity to collaborate and find solutions that don’t yet exist. If you document your problem solving methods and solutions, it can provide a framework for future learning, both for yourself and juniors.
Broaden your horizons by reading books, joining forums and sharing ideas with people in similar roles. As you gain expertise, share your knowledge, because not only does this help build your professional profile, but also helps to raise the bar on the complexities and challenges you get to tackle.

Learn skills beyond standard Salesforce jobs and IT, such as project management or change management. With architecture and technology changing rapidly, these are skills that managers need for successful project implementation.

Look to other industries. While being in the hub of an IT company may seem like the ideal environment for career progression, the reality is that all industries are IT dependent and as such there are opportunities to use your experience to make a big impact in other niche industries. The healthcare industry, insurance industry, retail, NGO’s, even government organisations are becoming more focused on technology to become more efficient.

2. Play to your strengths

There’s a saying: “You’ll never get bored if you’re doing what you love!” So find what you love to do and develop your skills around that. Knowing yourself and playing to your strengths can Salesforce Jobscontribute greatly to career satisfaction. Why? Because then you’re not simply doing what everyone else says you should be doing, or fitting in with what the organisation expects you to do. You’re building your Salesforce career not just doing another job.

IT professionals are often expected to work long hours in big open office environments with pressing deadlines and this can be a recipe for burnout. By knowing how you work best, and what environment makes you most productive, you can seek out other Salesforce jobs that offer what you need, instead of simply accepting what you can get.

3. Stay connected

Whether you attend conferences and seminars or engage on online forums, staying connected is a great way to develop your Salesforce career. You not only constantly stay abreast of what is happening in the industry, but you also have the opportunity of sharing knowledge with like-minded individuals.

Staying connected also helps you to keep moving forward as technology advances and creates opportunities to integrate the old with the new. Many new technologies are simply improvements or built on older proven technologies so expertise and knowledge is seldom wasted. One of the biggest challenges companies face is keeping up with technology developments. Staying connected on a personal level to other experts in the industry can provide valuable insights from other organisations as to how they overcame implementation challenges.

Finally, know that your Salesforce career is what you make it. It’s a platform offering a great deal of diversity and opportunities and suited to people of varying skills, expertise and personalities. Connect, collaborate and always be learning and you’ll find many opportunities to avoid stagnation and develop your Salesforce career. And if all else fails, speak to our expert Salesforce recruiters to give your career a boost!!

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

IT Managers of the future

Traditionally IT managers had a crucial role to fill in an organisation. They were the people co-ordinating the computer and data information systems as well as integrating with the telephony systems. But with the introduction and wider adoption of cloud based computing, many aspects of IT manager roles are becoming obsolete.

Does this mean that the role of IT managers will become entirely redundant in the future? Already in the past six years there has been a steady decline in the number of IT Manager roles being advertised. Is this an indication of things to come and what can traditional IT managers do to ensure they have a future career?

The IT Sector is evolving, IT Managers should too

The basic truth is that the IT sector is fast paced and constantly evolving – it’s one of the aspects that makes it an exciting industry to be working in. IT managers need to be involved in more thanIT Managers just systems maintenance and engineering-style work, they need to be adding value to a business if they want to avoid becoming obsolete. This includes embracing new technologies and finding ways to adapt their skills so that they are moving the business forward and keeping up with trends. Fortunately the trends show many opportunities for forward thinking IT managers.

According to a study by the US Bureau of Labour Statistics, jobs in the IT sector are set to grow by 22% by 2020, but that growth will not necessarily be the same across all sectors in the industry.

IT Manager roles are set to increase by 18%, however, this will not be in traditional roles. Cloud computing is likely to shift these roles towards systems design and security rather than traditional management. The industries where there are likely to be the most opportunities are in healthcare and IT security.

Database Administrator jobs are predicted to increase by 31% as the need to process and disseminate ever increasing volumes of data continues to grow. To stay competitive, administrators will need to keep up to date on technology development and systems integration.

Computer Programming and Helpdesk Technical Support job opportunities may increase by 14% and 18% respectively. Although there is a trend for outsourcing these roles which means that it is becoming more competitive in the industry.

The roles that seem to hold the most promise are those of systems analysts and software developers which may increase by 22% and 30% respectively. Key areas of growth include mobile apps and systems software. Looking at these trends, how can IT managers improve their skills so that they can adapt with changing industry trends and ensure that they have long term career prospects?

Skills worth developing

The reality is that most IT Managers will need to adapt and start to specialise in one or two areas of expertise. Getting familiar with new technology and using existing expertise and knowledge to expand on the value they are providing to their employers. The next generation of IT professionals are highly agile and if IT Manager want to stay in those management roles, they need to have the same level, if not more knowledge than the people working for them in their teams. These are some of the top areas that IT Managers could consider developing skills in:

Cloud Computing – This is currently the leading technology trend in the industry and with it comes many opportunities. Think data security and transfer or integration; Systems design and management; Data mining skills and statistical analysis.

User Interface Design – With an increasing demand for personalisation in the customer experience, UI design will become increasingly important. Businesses are accumulating vast amounts of data and they want to be able to incorporate the findings from that data to improve the user interface and customer experience.

Data Security – Given the vast amounts of data being collected on customers, there is a concern of vulnerability. The EU recently outlined their new privacy regulations and this is likely to have an impact on the way organizations think about designing and maintaining their systems.

Data Science & Visualisation – Currently there is a massive shortage of skills in this field and as big data technology expands there is likely to be even more demand for skilled data scientists. Technical knowledge and an analytical mind is well suited to this field.

Mobile apps & Development Management – Mobile technology has been at the forefront technology developments in recent years and predictions are that this trend will continue. While app development is fairly established, key elements in the future will be how to integrate this will a better UI, data mining and integration with CRM systems.

Project Management – regardless of the area of specialisation, IT managers that are skilled in project management will find themselves in more demand. As more technologies develop, integration is going to become a challenge. IT Managers that have a broad knowledge base of different technologies plus sound project management skills can find themselves overseeing large implementation and integration projects.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

The Challenges of Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce and What to do about It

In a world where employees frequently work well beyond the age of 60, and school leavers are now entering the workforce, companies are now facing a brand-new challenge – how to manage a multi-generational workforce. For the first time, in one workplace we have Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y, and Millennials. It’s easy to see how managers might struggle to align so many workers with disparate characteristics.

However, if you want the best selection of skill in your workforce, you’ll need to learn how to tackle the challenges, and encourage the people in your team to work together efficiently. It won’t’ be easy, as HR studies prove that in organisations with more than 500 employees, 58% of managers see conflicts between generations. However, if you can nail-down the multi-generational team, then you can access a talent pool that thinks outside of the box, and knows how to balance each other’s strengths and weaknesses.

Challenge 1: Managing Communication

Communication is key for any workforce. When using a specialist recruitment agency to find your ideal candidate for a role, the chances are that you consider communication style and interpersonal skills alongside education and experience. However, the difference between communication styles for different generations has become almost cliched. While Generation Y sends instant messages, Gen Xers prefer calls and emails.

Throw in the use of colloquialisms, informal language, and abbreviations, and you’ve got everything you need for a serious breakdown in communications.

The Answer: Encourage Collaboration

When communication suffers, it can be tempting to segment your workforce. However, if you can influence the different generations in your team to learn from each other, and find a mutual language, then you will see significant benefits. Just because generations communicate differently doesn’t mean they’re incompatible.

By shifting the collective mindset and pushing different generations to see each other as partners, rather than members of a segmented workforce, everyone can benefit from new ideas, and new forms of communication.

Challenge 2: Motivating the Workforce

A motivated workforce is an engaged workforce. However, there’s more to keeping your employees happy than simply offering the right salary. Motivating employees often means creating a company culture that supports everyone’s ideals and goals. It may include the use of perks, and flexible working strategies that allow different generations to pursue different aims in their careers and to work in a variety of ways to achieve them.

 

The Answer: Treat Everyone as an Individual

Rather than trying to motivate different people with the same selection of benefits, it could be easier to personalise your approach to motivation. For instance, when the time comes to reward an employee, ask them what they would appreciate most – from extra time off work, to a remote working schedule.

In addition, you can use this customised motivational strategy as a way of differentiating your business when it comes to asking your specialist recruitment team to find the employees that are right for you. If candidates know that they can choose their own perks, they’re far more likely to be drawn to your company culture.

Challenge 3: Negative Stereotypes

Whatever their differences might be, it’s incredibly important to make sure that companies don’t play up to the stereotypes of each generation. Older workers often think of millennials as tech-obsessed and entitled, while younger workers think of Baby boomers as old-fashioned, and stubborn.

The truth is that although different generations can have different work styles and preferences, they’re not so two-dimensional that they can be labelled under specific stereotypes. As a leader, it’s up to you to move your team beyond the labels.

 

The Answer: Focus on Valuing People for Individual Strengths

Don’t assume that certain people in your team need special help and treatment. Don’t focus on the weaknesses that members of your workforce might have. Instead, get to know each person individually, and focus on drawing value to their strengths. Remember, mixed-age teams can deliver a wealth of opportunity to the business environment. Fresh thinking combined with experience can lead to highly effective results.

Watch out for any dysfunction in the workplace caused by generational judgements, and step in when necessary.

Challenge 4: Balancing Strengths and Weaknesses 

Finally, each generation delivers their own unique characteristics to the workforce. Those differences should be embraced to help companies get the most out of their teams. Too often, managers see the gaps between their team members as negatives. However, building a team that’s brimming with diverse insights, perspectives, and strengths can only be helpful to your company.

The Answer: Cross Generational Mentoring 

Make the most of the individual strengths and weaknesses your team members have by building a reciprocal mentoring program. Here, younger employees can teach older ones how to use social media and other technology, while older generations can provide guidance into interpersonal skills, communication, while sharing their knowledge about how the business operates strategically and that important topic of how to navigate company politics should they arise.

Allow team members to learn from each other, and turn to other members of the organisation when they need help balancing their strengths and weaknesses.

Benefits NOT Features on your CV – “Make your USP stick.” (geddit?)

Sitting down to write your CV can be challenging, especially for tech people such as Salesforce Developers. After all data is your forte, not words. How do you get across your expertise without sounding like a robot? Here are some tips on how to make your USP stick and make your CV stand out from the pile of other Salesforce Developers on a recruiter’s desk.

Getting the basics right

Starting out, create a framework of headings ensure that you include all the important information such as skills, experience and accolades. Once completed, a CV should be on average 2 pages, maximum 3. Starting out it may be useful to write down a few bullet points under each heading. This can then be the core content that you use to develop your CV.

Anyone can create a frame work with basic facts, but that’s not what will sell you to a recruiters. To do this you need to start thinking like a marketer, what will make them choose you above everyone else? And the answer to this is fairly simple – what’s in it for them?

It’s not about you

Yes you heard right, your CV isn’t actually about you, the experienced Salesforce Developer, it’s about your potential employer. Yes it may feature all your skills and accolades, but unless you can Salesforce Developers CV Frustrationpresent all of that in a way that demonstrates a benefit to them, your CV holds no real value.

Let’s start by understanding the difference between a feature and a benefit. A feature is a skill, a form of experience, or a personality trait. For example: You have 8 years of experience working as a Salesforce Developer. That’s just a feature, there are lots of people that have many years’ worth of experience, that doesn’t mean they can do the job effectively.  You need to translate what those 8 years of experience mean for the company, what you achieved for the business in that time and how will your experience benefit them?

To write this in a way that demonstrates a future benefit to the potential employer, consider the following questions: How will your 8 years’ worth of experience save them money? How will it save them time? Will your systems knowledge increase sales or turnover or reduce overheads? Will your methodologies improve productivity? Will your management style improve team engagement and ensure that deadlines are met saving them money and building an industry reputation?

Ultimately you can have the most impressive list of accolades of any Salesforce Developer out there, but unless you make it clear how your particular skills and experience will benefit the company they won’t give your CV a second glance.

How to write benefits not features

Example of a feature sentence: Managed a 100+ person team dealing with integration points to third party products.

When you read that sentence what do you think? Does it make you sit up and say: “This is someone I want in my team?” or do you think: “That’s nice…..” The sentence is written as a feature, it tells what the person has done, it doesn’t translate into anything tangible that benefited the business and doesn’t tell the recruiter what the person can do for them if they were to be hired.

Now consider this same sentence written as a benefit: Managed a large (100+) team that created a number of product opportunities and business partnerships by integrating with third party applications and platforms.

See how different this is? When you read this sentence what do you pick up on? “This person created business partnerships – that could help me grow my business, that’s a benefit. They created a number of product opportunities too – that’s something my business needs. Plus they did this while managing a large team, so they must have good management skills and be a good team leader – that would be a definite benefit to my business.”

A CV with vision

Reading this sentence has the person thinking in terms of the future of their business and this is what you want to achieve with your CV as a Salesforce Developer. You want to communicate that you are the person that can take their business to the next level, help them gain market share or a competitive edge. You are the one that can help solve a problem they have been facing or help them to overcome industry challenges.  This is what will make them sit up and take notice of your CV and invite you in for an interview.

When creating your CV, think a little tech and a lot of sales and make everything about them. Every sentence must translate into: “This is what I can do and this is how it can benefit you!”

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Managers & Leaders: Which one are you?

Working in recruitment, I am no stranger to people asking me, what makes a good Salesforce manager and what makes a good Salesforce leader? And aren’t they the same thing?Salesforce Manager

Whilst it’s true that someone could actually be both an excellent manager and an inspiring leader, flitting between the two depending on the situation, there are certain traits that set the two roles apart.

Managers Set Goals; Leaders Shape Visions

Managers are there to ensure that a team is working effectively and efficiently.  They are responsible for understanding what needs to be accomplished and ensuring that this is communicated to the team.  They will go to great pains to ensure that goals and performance is carefully monitored. And that the overall objectives for individuals, the team and the company are met.

Leaders on the other hand, are very much about selling new ideas to the team. Rather than set goals they will encourage people to be creative; to think for themselves and carve and seek out new opportunities for the business.

Managers Control Risks; Leaders Take Risks

A Manager’s aim is to reduce or minimise risk for the business. And should they need to take risks, they are usually carefully calculated, drawing from past data to ensure that the company is not unduly exposed.

Leaders on the other hand, try new things.  Often they will break the rules as the navigate uncharted territory for the company.  They often think about the long-term bigger picture and are at their weakest when bogged down in detail.

Managers Fear Change; Leaders Hate Repetition

Good Managers are often process driven. Every area of the business will have a carefully tried-and-test well thought out workflow.  Managers will be adept at seeing problems in the process and will have a plan to resolve it before it escalates.

Leaders on the other hand, challenge.  They will take a process, whether it’s broken or not and try to figure out, how to make it better.  They will seek areas for improvement and will continuously question those around them.

Managers Instruct; Leaders Encourage

Managers tend to ‘tell’ others what needs to be done, giving approval and feedback to their employees when things go right, or wrong. They establish the rules in which their employees work, assigning duties as they go. They rely heavily on control and most decisions are made in a logical way, deciding on what makes most ‘sense’ for the business.

Leaders on the other hand, encourage those around them to think for themselves and try new things. They motivate individuals and actively encourage new ideas.  For them mistakes are all part of the learning journey. They inspire trust in others, and often go by gut instinct alone.

Whether you consider yourself a Manager, a Leader, or even a bit of both; there is almost certainly place for both in any business. The best businesses in the world may have an inspiring Leader at the helm. But, you can bet on there being a talented Manager at the helm.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.