Is paying well, enough to retain employees?

Money isn’t quite the motivator it used to be in terms of employee retention. Today employees don’t just want to know that they are earning a decent salary, they want to know it compares favourably with both their peers and industry standards. If they find out they are earning below par it can be a big demotivating factor. So how can companies best manage salaries to ensure employee retention?

Companies are always seeking to optimise their salary spend, but they need to look at this from a broader perspective. Retaining good employees is far more cost effective in the long term than having to recruit and retrain new people. An employee who is earning a standard annual increase may be happy with their earnings, until that is they find out that a new recruit is earning much more or that what they earn is not quite on par with what is being offered elsewhere.

The younger generation of employees is less risk adverse and therefore quite willing to move when better opportunities present themselves. Companies that don’t offer competitive salaries or band peer salaries in the same bracket could find themselves losing some of their best employees because of this.

What peer compensation means to employees

An article published in the Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 2017, Vol. 64 No.1, titled Monetary Reference Points of Managers – Empirical Evidence of Status Quo Preferences and Social Comparisons; supports this view highlighting the effect of peer compensation on job satisfaction.Salary

According to the article, job satisfaction is directly proportional to whether employees perceive that they are being fairly or more than fairly paid, and declines if they feel they are being unfairly paid compared to their peers.

But does this apply to all employees across all levels, genders and industries? Interestingly enough, women didn’t seem as affected by peer earnings as men provided they were satisfied with their own earnings. The job satisfaction ratio was also more applicable to people on fixed income rather than those on commission or variable salaries. In terms of management positions peer salary levels were a major deciding factor in setting management salaries. Younger employees also seemed more concerned with peer earnings. This has been attributed to the fact that being younger, they see peer earnings as an indication of possible future earnings and align opportunities accordingly.

What companies can learn from this

Businesses need to benchmark salaries with consideration of both internal salaries as well as external competitor salaries. Employees are likely to compare their earnings and business need to be aware that if they are paying below par, it’s highly likely to lead to a level of job dis-satisfaction. Informing and educating employees as to the compensation policies as well as the benchmarks can help avoid job dissatisfaction because it helps employees to manage their expectations. This also give employees something to work toward if they are just starting out in their careers and want to move up within the organization.

Offering competitive salaries enables companies to attract top talent. Despite the fact that women are not as concerned with peer earnings, they do still need to feel that they are being paid their worth, so this should not be viewed as an opportunity to offer less, just because an employee is female.

But most importantly bench-marking policies should be part of a greater strategy to retain good employees. Understand what their expectations are and what’s important to them in terms of compensation. The trend is also leaning towards other employee benefits such as flexi-time or work from home options, recreation facilities or incentives for employees to maintain a healthy lifestyle. For some people these benefits may be more valuable to them and be seen as just as worthwhile as a higher salary.

The working environment is becoming more transparent as it’s becoming easier to obtain information relating to salaries and compensation packages. A simple online search can reveal what positions are available in the industry and what salaries are being offered. Employees do not need to be actively searching for another job to know what other options are out there. Salaries may not be the sole deciding factor when employees are contemplating staying or going, but perceived fair earnings can certainly tip the scales in terms of job satisfaction.

Employee retention is vital for a business that wants to achieve a healthy growth curve. It creates continuity where expertise is being added and built on rather than having to be renewed every time a new employee is brought on board. Including bench-marking in human resource management is a wise move, one that can not only grow the business, but help ensure that employees enjoy a great level of job satisfaction, knowing they are being fairly rewarded for their efforts.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management, software testing and Salesforce.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

How to Answer Those’s Really Tough Interview Questions

Enjoying a successful interview in today’s competitive technology job market can be a challenging feat. If you want to be prepared for your next interview, then you need to know how to answer the complex, questions your hiring manager is likely to ask the next time you apply for the job of a lifetime.  

Hiring managers aren’t picking complicated questions to stress you out or throw you off your game. Remember, like you’re looking for the perfect role, the company you’re interviewing with are looking for the ideal candidate. Those tough questions are your interviewer’s chance to get a deeper understanding of who you are, and what makes you a good fit for the organisation.  

Here, we’ll look at 5 tough interview questions, and how you can answer them.  

 

1. Questions About Co-workers: “How Did You Feel About Your Last Team?”

Most staff members won’t work in a silo, disconnected from the rest of the business. That means that when your hiring manager wants to see how you’ll work as part of a team, they’ll ask about your previous experiences with other employees. For instance, they might ask, “How did you feel about the people you worked with in your last role?” 

The key here is to stay away from negative answers. If you don’t have anything positive to say about your old coworkers, be honest and professional in your reply, such as: “We had a few debates on how individual projects should be handled; it’s natural I guess. I have always been a team player. In fact, on my last project I…” 

Emphasise how you developed your rapport building skills to connect with colleagues who communicated and worked in a different way to yourself.

Give examples of project teams that you were part of and what roles you had in the various teams
and what the outcomes of the projects were.

Remember that any interviewing manager knows that not everyone in a team will be ‘best friends’. What they are looking for is how you handle situations.

 

2. Questions About Failure: “Tell Me About a Time When You Didn’t Succeed”

During any interview experience, the hiring manager you speak to will want to assess your abilities, and how you’re going to impact the existing team, you are soon to be a part of. Though they’ll want to see examples of your achievements, and the things you might have accomplished in the past, they’ll also be interested in finding out how you respond to failure.  

No-one wins all the time.  

The key to being successful with your answers here is to think about how you can discuss what you learned from your mistakes. Explain how a previous situation went wrong, then tell your interviewer how you adapted to the experience, and what you’ve done to reduce the risk of similar problems occurring in the future. For instance, if you didn’t meet a deadline to implement a programme on time because a client was too vague with their specifications, you might have come up with a more intuitive way to ask for briefs from future customers.

 

3. Questions About Weakness: “Describe Your Biggest Flaw?”

This is another interview question that can be complicated and a challenge to answer. When you’re trying to make sure that you show your most “hireable” side to the business, it can seem counterproductive to highlight your flaws. However, with this question, your hiring manager is looking to see that you’re willing to accept your development areas and deal with them.  

Avoid telling your interviewer that you don’t have any shortcomings, or offer vague answers like “I’m a perfectionist”. Instead, be honest about the things that you’re not great at. Try to choose a something that isn’t going to be a deal breaker based on what you learned from the job description, then show the company that you’re currently focused on a process of self-development, intended to help you improve your skills and abilities.  

 

4. Questions About Motivation:

The purpose of an interview is for employers to understand more about candidates and how they will fit into the company culture as well as their fit for a role. A part of this will be finding out more about who you are, and what motivates you towards success.

Contrary to what many people think, salary isn’t the No 1 motivator. Yes, we all need it to support ourselves and families, and there is far more to this question.

The most common question you will be asked is “What motivates you?”, sometimes you may hear, “What’s important to you about the job you do and your career?”

This kind of question explore your “values”, and the interviewer is looking to see if your own personal values align with the values of the company you are applying to work for.

Examples of what motivates individuals are;  

  • Having interesting and meaningful work 
  • Being able to use their skills fully 
  • Opportunities to contribute outside their primary role responsibilities 
  • Development opportunities 
  • Working alone, or with others depending on the role 
  • Achieving goals 
  • Seeing a career pathway 
  • Personal and team recognition 
  • Having close working relationships with colleagues 
  • Flexible working opportunities 
  • Working with an inspiring manager 

While it can be easy to check out your prospective employer’s values on their website and
talk about things that relate to these values, if you don’t share these values
you are at risk of talking yourself into a role and company that you are likely to be unhappy in.

Be clear at the outset of any interview what is important to you about a new role and the company.

 

5. Questions about Goals: “Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years”

Most employers want to know that the people that they hire have ambitions and passion. In other words, have an idea of what you want to accomplish not just in general, but in the context of your potential new role within a team.

Think about where you’d like your career to go if you were offered the job, and what you could do to improve your chances of reaching your own personal career aspirations. For instance, if you’re hoping to be a team leader in three years, how are you going to make that a reality? 

Although there’s nothing wrong with talking about how the company in question could support you to achieve your goals; don’t make it sound like your future rests entirely on your new employer’s shoulders. It’s up to you to make sure you can drive your own career growth. 

The New Remote Control

There is one distinct advantage that technology has brought to the workplace – the ability to connect remotely and work from just about anywhere in the world. This is providing both businessesRemote Workforce and employees greater flexibility. Not only can employees work from home or off site locations, but organisations can access talent and expertise from around the world. (Sometimes even making use of time zone differences to improve project continuity and efficiency.)

However, engaging a remote workforce is not without its challenges, especially as many organisations use old outdated technology for project collaboration. Email is great for one-on-one communication but can get messy when there are multiple recipients. Similarly multiple people working on the same spreadsheets can make it difficult to determine which one is most up to date.

Research shows that team members on average use five different tools to manage projects which is not the most efficient way of doing things as the lack of integration can hinder collaboration. Does this mean that old technology should make way for new? Or should businesses rather rethink their remote control?

Keys for successful remote working

To make the concept of a remote workforce more efficient, organisations need to have a clearer understanding of what tools are available that will facilitate better collaboration. Here are some key elements to consider:

Project Management – A cloud based centralized system can help facilitate better project management by improving security, workflows and management ability. Individual projects can be coordinated through virtual office hubs that manage the remote workforce. At any given time project managers can update clients on project progress and see who is working on specific tasks. Gantt charts can be incorporated into the cloud based project management system to facilitate this.

Planning and scheduling – Tied in with project management is the ability to schedule tasks for remote workforce members according to their specific expertise within the centralised cloud system. Online team planning meetings can be coordinated and outcomes can be linked into the project schedule.

Document sharing – One of the biggest challenges is when people are simultaneously working on documents and at the end of the day it’s difficult to determine what’s the latest updated version. Cloud based document sharing can track who makes what changes while viewing the latest version. Some technologies allow different levels of access for people in different roles which improves document integrity and security.

Task coordination – Kanban boards with specific remote workforce member tasks resemble small post-it notes can be linked into the Gantt charts. This enables team members and managers to view tasks at a glance and see progress. It can also help manage workloads and identify who may be available to take on new tasks, or who needs help with their workload.

While there are many cloud based systems available, organisations need to be careful about choosing one that is specific to their needs. Many promise nice sounding optional extras but in reality the simpler the remote workforce management tools the more likely team members are to use them and the easier it will be to co-ordinate projects.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Preventing Salesforce Career Stagnation

The traditional model of career progression was: learn as skill, get a job, get promoted, become a manager, then keep that job until you retire. The problem with that is that not only does it limit opportunities, but it’s also a fast recipe for stagnation. If you’re only developing skills and experience in one specific Salesforce niche, chances are at some point you’ll get bored, but with no option for upward progression you may feel stuck. And this is especially an issue when industries or technologies start to mature.

In the UK, Salesforce is starting to reach a level of maturity. Have you considered that maybe it’s time to move on and gain some fresh experience to prevent career stagnation? Despite what you may think, the best careers are those that are not linear. It’s not always about moving up, sometimes a side step or even a backwards step is the best career move you can make because it can lead to new and often better opportunities. Here are our three top tips for preventing career stagnation:

1. Always be learning

This goes far beyond the basics of fulfilling a Salesforce job in terms of development, integration or coding. When you are conscious about learning you are always on the lookout for opportunities to do so, and this in itself is what opens many doors. Even a lunch time chat with a junior colleague may highlight an area they are struggling with. It can plant an idea, open up an opportunity to collaborate and find solutions that don’t yet exist. If you document your problem solving methods and solutions, it can provide a framework for future learning, both for yourself and juniors.
Broaden your horizons by reading books, joining forums and sharing ideas with people in similar roles. As you gain expertise, share your knowledge, because not only does this help build your professional profile, but also helps to raise the bar on the complexities and challenges you get to tackle.

Learn skills beyond standard Salesforce jobs and IT, such as project management or change management. With architecture and technology changing rapidly, these are skills that managers need for successful project implementation.

Look to other industries. While being in the hub of an IT company may seem like the ideal environment for career progression, the reality is that all industries are IT dependent and as such there are opportunities to use your experience to make a big impact in other niche industries. The healthcare industry, insurance industry, retail, NGO’s, even government organisations are becoming more focused on technology to become more efficient.

2. Play to your strengths

There’s a saying: “You’ll never get bored if you’re doing what you love!” So find what you love to do and develop your skills around that. Knowing yourself and playing to your strengths can Salesforce Jobscontribute greatly to career satisfaction. Why? Because then you’re not simply doing what everyone else says you should be doing, or fitting in with what the organisation expects you to do. You’re building your Salesforce career not just doing another job.

IT professionals are often expected to work long hours in big open office environments with pressing deadlines and this can be a recipe for burnout. By knowing how you work best, and what environment makes you most productive, you can seek out other Salesforce jobs that offer what you need, instead of simply accepting what you can get.

3. Stay connected

Whether you attend conferences and seminars or engage on online forums, staying connected is a great way to develop your Salesforce career. You not only constantly stay abreast of what is happening in the industry, but you also have the opportunity of sharing knowledge with like-minded individuals.

Staying connected also helps you to keep moving forward as technology advances and creates opportunities to integrate the old with the new. Many new technologies are simply improvements or built on older proven technologies so expertise and knowledge is seldom wasted. One of the biggest challenges companies face is keeping up with technology developments. Staying connected on a personal level to other experts in the industry can provide valuable insights from other organisations as to how they overcame implementation challenges.

Finally, know that your Salesforce career is what you make it. It’s a platform offering a great deal of diversity and opportunities and suited to people of varying skills, expertise and personalities. Connect, collaborate and always be learning and you’ll find many opportunities to avoid stagnation and develop your Salesforce career. And if all else fails, speak to our expert Salesforce recruiters to give your career a boost!!

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

When the shoes don’t fit – is your business guilty of workplace discrimination?

In most industries the days of wearing a suit and tie to work are long gone. Even in large international corporate consultancies the norm is generally smart casual, such as a collared shirt for men Workplace Discriminationwith long pants. Often employees are given some leeway and allowed to express their personality in their dress, especially in creative industries such marketing or programming, but is this a double edged sword? Do people get judged more harshly if they dress differently and do employers have a right to dictate what people should wear to work?

What defines workplace discrimination?

In a recent BBC article it asked the question if it was workplace discrimination to insist that women need to wear high heels. Some companies have policies that ban bright nail polish or insist that tattoos are covered. Is this acceptable or should personal expression be allowed?

According to the law, companies need to be able to justify their reasons for specific dress codes. For example an airline may insist that hostesses have their hair neatly tied up if it is long. This is justifiable because it is both practical – working in a confined space, and hygenic – as they are serving food. But office based professions may have a harder time enforcing dress code rules, especially when it is gender specific, because if bias can be proven, then companies could find themselves in hot water.

When workplace discrimination is detrimental?

Aside from lawsuits, sometimes bias could simply hinder a company’s growth and development. For example: Conservative thinkers may assume that someone with tattoos isn’t as intelligent or wouldn’t fit into a corporate environment when they could be the ideal candidate with just the right skill set for the job. The fact that they have tattoos has no impact at all on their ability to do the job well.

Similarly, high heels have proven negative effects on health, causing spinal discomfort and even injuries in the long term. They also increase the risks of workplace accidents. Companies insisting that women wear high heels are not only increasing their own liability risk, they are also inadvertently discriminating based on gender. If men aren’t expected to wear high heels, why should women?

Why allowing individual expression can be good for business?

Restrictive dress policies, other than when necessary for health and safety reasons, are often counterproductive. What do they really achieve? Other than stifling creative thinking and reducing employee engagement. Nobody wants to be just another number in an organisation. They want to be recognized for who they are and what they can do, regardless how they look or dress.
Many creative companies are led by people who like to break convention, even wearing shorts and t-shirts or crazy colours and designs to the office, because to them what you wear doesn’t matter. They just want to know you can do the job. Isn’t it time to chuck workplace discrimination and conservative bias out the window and instead foster a company culture that allows individuals to be themselves, so that they can excel in their working environment and help you grow the business.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Millennials and how to hire them effectively for the future

In the next ten years the workforce will consist of 75% Millennials. Already as consumers they are displaying vastly different behaviours from previous generations changing the face of how businesses operate. Therefore, it stands to reason they will have different expectations from employers too.

How are companies adapting for this new breed of employee that’s forward thinking, connected, unconstrained and uninterested in how things have been done for years. Millennials are not the type to be molded into what companies want and they have a lot to offer. Businesses would be far better off adapting and creating work environments that encourage the development of their skills, as well as finding ways to hold on to that talent.

What are Millennials about and what do they want?

Millennials have a greater level of social and environmental consciousness than previous generations. They are attuned to what they want – which is a connection between what they do and whatMillennials - hiring for the future! they value. They look for meaning in their work, want relationships with their bosses, are tech savvy, task oriented and very open to change. They also want feedback, recognition and opportunities to learn. 90% of millennials expect to stay in a job for 3 years or less and are quick to move on to companies that align with their personal values and ambitions. With company loyalty not a high priority, how do organizations hold on to top talent when it comes to millennials?

Key factors to engaging with Millennials

Millennials appreciate coaching and mentoring and the opportunity to build genuine relationships with bosses and senior colleagues. They want to work towards set targets and know that they’ll get support in reaching them and acknowledgement when they do. Most importantly if there are opportunities for further learning and growth, they’re more likely to stay within an organisation than look elsewhere.

One technology that can help an organization achieve better employee engagement is gamification. Millennials are tech savvy and like to stay connected. Gamification uses gaming principles to provide opportunities for self-directed learning that people can do at their own pace. It can support the efforts of on-boarding and mentoring, and also encourages collaboration and friendly competition between departments. When employees complete modules or achieve targets they get instant recognition. And the best part of gamification is that once it is set up, it doesn’t require many resources to maintain.

Another aspect that is important to Millennials is values. They are attracted to companies whose values align with their own. For years it was believed that achieving a work life balance was the responsibility of the individual employee, but now companies are recognising that they also have a role to play. By providing better work environments, with flexible work options and different forms of relaxation, they are finding their staff are more content and more productive.

It is these types of companies that will be far more successful in attracting and retaining top millennial talent and it will be worth it. While many predict that Millennials are the workforce that require the most maintenance, they are also recognised as the most productive.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Women in Tech: Should a gap in a CV be frowned upon?  

Many employees, especially women, fear that having a gap on their CV will put them at a disadvantage when it comes to landing a job. Especially if the time taken off was to raise a family. They areWomen In Tech often unsure if their skills are still relevant and if they will be able to fit back into a corporate environment.

Some organisations are taking the initiative to help women to get back into the workplace through mentoring and coaching programs. They are believe that there’s a pool of talent that businesses are missing out on, and that by helping women transition back into the workplace, everyone can benefit.

For women, it’s often more a case of self-doubt rather than valuable skills that prevents them from taking the leap back into the workplace. But with some outside perspective to highlight the knowledge and skills they possess, and some encouragement to put themselves out there, returning women often prove to be some of the best employees – dedicated and hardworking, because they genuinely appreciate the work opportunity.

But the process is not without its challenges, despite the drawcard of earning a salary again, returning to work often carries extra family expenses such as child care, be it in the form of crèche or carers who can assist with running around for school activities and extra murals. This is especially true for low income earners.

This highlights the importance of women knowing their worth and having the confidence to ask for the salary and employment terms they need to make the opportunity work. Employers who are willing to allow some flexibility and encourage women to return to work through mentorship programmes may find themselves with very valuable employees.

Resource On Demand (ROD) is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Agency. They were founded in 2007 and are highly respected across the entire Salesforce ecosystem. Their specialist areas of recruitment include; Salesforce (SFDC); digital marketing and marketing automation technologies, which include Eloqua, Marketo, ExactTarget and Pardot; Human Capital Management (HCM) technologies such as Workday and SAP HCM and SuccessFactors. For more information contact ROD on rod@resourceondemand.com or on 020 8123 7769.

Gut reactions are not something to bring to the hiring process

hiring-processWe have interviewed many applicants for jobs within our company. So as employers we understand that when interviewing you often get a ‘gut feeling’ about an applicant. And typically many interviewers rely on this ‘gut feeling’ when trying to make a decision between two applicants within the hiring process. And whilst it is hard to ignore at times, hiring decisions based on feelings are a definite no-no.

What really matter within the decision making process is choosing an individual based on whether they have the ability to do the job and that they can add value to the company.

Going with your ‘gut feeling’ can be very costly to a company. Reports have shown that the hiring failure rate for hiring based on ‘gut reactions’ is 50%. In real terms, the out of pocket cost to an employer is around £13k to £29k in the first 3 to 6 months. Of course, you could also argue this statistic the other way round, that you have a 50/50 chance of hiring the perfect person… but is really worth the risk? The answer, if it wasn’t obvious, is no.  

An interviewer’s gut reaction generally comes from past experiences and emotions. But, you need to remember what is important in the on-boarding process, and that is their ability to the job. When making hiring decisions based on gut feeling, you tend to forget this important factor.

To ensure you conduct a gut-feeling-free interview, we suggest that you carry out a more data driven interview. One that is based on hard facts and the careful use of competency based questions to determine future behaviours.  To get more hiring process advice, see our employers tab here.

Resource On Demand (ROD) is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Agency. They were founded in 2007 and are highly respected across the entire Salesforce ecosystem. Their specialist areas of recruitment include; Salesforce (SFDC); digital marketing and marketing automation technologies, which include Eloqua, Marketo, ExactTarget and Pardot; Human Capital Management (HCM) technologies such as Workday and SAP HCM and SuccessFactors. For more information contact ROD on rod@resourceondemand.com or on 020 8123 7769.

Give Me Feedback!

Okay, so you may have opted against using a recruitment agency! “No, that’s crazy” you hear us scream.  Sadly, many smaller businesses lack the resources to employ a full time HR personnel to manage the recruitment process and often land themselves in hot water over poorly managed processes.  But, what many employers and small business don’t realise is that your recruiter can offer more than just fantastic Adobe Campaign or Eloqua candidates to fill your role.  They can give you sound advice on the whole recruitment process. So what are the top tips for getting it right?

Feedback

Adobe CampaignIt never fails to surprise us how often clients don’t give feedback.  Whether you are using a recruitment agency or not, feedback for the applicant is an important part of the process, but unfortunately only around 41% are provided feedback after an unsuccessful interview.

There is nothing worse for an applicant than submitting their CV to never get feedback, and even worse when they don’t hear back on how their interview went.  Unsurprisingly around 83% of applicants say that a poorly managed interview experience will actually put them off the role and the company.

But, don’t panic thinking that you are going to get bogged down in a deluge of administration around CV and interview feedback. Just a few well crafted templates is all you need to make the overall applicant experience a better one.  And if you do have a fantastic Adobe Campaign recruitment partner, such as ROD, then most of this work can and will be done by them!

For further advice on the interview process,  read our helpful resources guides.

Use Scorecards

As a hiring manager, you probably find yourself interviewing candidates one minute, then running off to internal or client meetings the next.  Sound familiar? What usually happens in these situations, is that interviewers then rely on rushed notes to put their hiring suggestions across to their HR team to process offers and applicant feedback.  And, if like us you find yourself interviewing 5 or 6 candidates in a day, you can often forget the finer details of an applicant.

This is where scorecards come in handy.  Scoring applicants against their soft skills and technical skills, such as Adobe Campaign implementation projects, as you interview them, not only helps you to compare multiple candidates quickly.  But means that you can rely on factual decision making, if you find yourself struggling to recall individual applicants.  And more importantly avoiding those expensive mistakes through relying on your gut-instinct.

Note Taking

Regardless of the number of applicants you are interviewing, making notes immediately is important. Jotting down particular skills, accomplishments, or projects an individual has worked on is a handy way of reminding yourself about an applicants strengths.  However, be very cautious with your note taking.  Under the Data Protection Act 1998 an applicant is entitled to request the personal information you hold on them and how this information will be used.  Interview notes may therefore, full into personal data.   So keep your notes factual, and do not make notes that are deemed to be ‘personal’ and certainly not discriminatory.

Keep it timely 

Setting realistic time frames within the business to respond and process interview feedback is fundamental in ensuring your applicants, even if they are unsuccessful, will have a thoroughly positive experience.

At least 80% of the companies we have dealt with, have at some point experienced the loss of a potentially good applicant, because they took too long to get back to the applicant following an interview.  And quite frankly it hurts.  The time and effort that a takes to organise multiple interviews, ensuring that hiring managers are off client site, and possibly traveling to central locations, all adds to the overall recruitment costs.  Our advice is to avoid having to restart the process all over again, at all costs.

Constructive Honesty

Telling an applicant they aren’t successful is never pleasant, but sadly it is a necessary evil. A whopping 94% of applicants want to have interview feedback, good or bad. But providing feedback is not about saying “Thanks for considering us, but not at this stage”.  Its about offering something more constructive and transparent.  However, many companies avoid feedback for fear of recriminations and accusations levied at them by the applicant. But feedback if done well and honestly, can be hugely beneficial to the business, in that it drives great PR across social media.

In the digital marketing and marketing automation world especially, word and bad experiences travel fast. Therefore always make sure your applicants have a really positive experience, even if unsuccessful.

Resource On Demand (ROD) is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Agency. They were founded in 2007 and are highly respected across the entire Salesforce ecosystem. Their specialist areas of recruitment include; Salesforce (SFDC); digital marketing and marketing automation technologies, which include Eloqua, Marketo, ExactTarget and Pardot; Human Capital Management (HCM) technologies such as Workday and SAP HCM and SuccessFactors. For more information contact ROD on rod@resourceondemand.com or on 020 8123 7769.

Should you be carrying out employee referencing?

Since 2007, we have worked with many cloud technology start ups and SMB’s, and are continually surprised how often employee referencing plays almost no part in the overall application process. Whilst it is true that some references provide little information about the individuals ability to do the job, references themselves can play a significant role in verifying the applicants work history, dates of employment and much more.

If you constantly find yourselves forgoing employee referencing, then STOP! Read our ‘Hiring Process: Reference Checking’ guide now, for more information. And don’t forget to set time aside now for this vital part of the hiring process.

Employee Referencing

Resource On Demand (ROD) is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Agency. They were founded in 2007 and are highly respected across the entire Salesforce ecosystem. Their specialist areas of recruitment include; Salesforce (SFDC); digital marketing and marketing automation technologies, which include Eloqua, Marketo, ExactTarget and Pardot; Human Capital Management (HCM) technologies such as Workday and SAP HCM and SuccessFactors. For more information contact ROD on rod@resourceondemand.com or on 020 8123 7769.