3 Reasons Why Job-Hopping May Not Secure Your CMO Career Goal

Young marketers searching for an opportunity in the business world can be ambitious, optimistic, and brimming with potential. Also, many of them are also part of the “millennial” generation, known for their somewhat ‘different’ approach to career development. 

Today, it seems that job-hopping has become a way of life for some young professionals in the marketing sector. Younger candidates often feel that they’re more likely to find the role of their dreams by jumping from one position to another, than they are spending a growing number of years with the same company.  

However, if you’re thinking of embracing a strategy of short-term employment, it’s worth noting that it might do more damage to your career than you think. In fact, contant movement could mean you will miss out on the perfect career opportunity and a chance to realise your career goal of becoming a CMO.

 

Are Millennials Spending Enough Time in Their Roles? 

While there’s some debate over whether it’s millennials, or young people in general that have popularised the concept of job-hopping, a 2016 survey found that 42% of millennials change employers every one-to-three years, compared to 18% of the workforce overall.  

Unstable and unpredictable employees can be a nightmare for businesses who want to secure the best future CMO talent in the market for their organisation. While many candidates believe that moving from one company to another will help them to gather new skills, the truth is that it can cause a range of problems for their employment future.  

So, what are some of the real consequences that come with being a job-hopper, and why might it be the worst way to secure your future? 

 

1. YouMiss Out on Internal Opportunities

Some Millennials claim to play the career market because they’re hoping to move up the corporate ladder. However, they don’t realise that leaving their current position can mean missing out on chances for internal promotion.  

A leadership role like “CMO” is more likely to be filled by a loyal internal staff member than an external hire. Once you’ve found an organisation you feel comfortable with, it may be more beneficial to search for opportunities for internal advancement, instead of checking online forums for “something better”.
 

2. You Put Future Employers Off

Although not all hiring managers will consider job-hopping to be a red flag, around 40% of recruiters suggest that a history of short-term employment can be a worrying sign. After all, turnover and recruitment are expensive concerns for most specialist companies. The last thing a business wants is to hire a talented digital marketing expert with future CMO potential, invest in their development, and then see them move elsewhere.  

When you frequently jump from one role to another, you suggest to your future team that you’re likely to do the same thing again. In a world where the costs of a bad hire can be catastrophic for any organisation, many employers are searching for reliability and security.

 

3. You Get Fewer Opportunities to Learn

While people who change jobs regularly might have a wide variety of experiences within different industries, they can lack the in-depth insights acquired through years in the same company.  

When you’re hoping to become a high-level team member like a CMO, you’ll often find that you get better opportunities to expand your skillset within an organisation that you’ve spent time with. Few businesses are willing to invest time and money into training a specialist who has only been with them for a few months, or seems likely to switch to a different role soon.  

 

Questions to Ask Before You Change Jobs

The millennial generation is used to instant satisfaction. You have immediate access to knowledge and information from around the world, available at the click of a button. While this is a good thing, it’s also meant that many younger professionals have lost the virtue of patience when it comes to achieving the perfect career.  

While there are circumstances when searching for a new job is the best option, here are a few questions to stop you from becoming yet another member of the role-hopping stereotype: 

  1. Am I Leaving Too Soon? You’ll need a compelling narrative to tell future hiring managers why you have left previous positions so quickly.   
  2. Do I Have a Good Reason? Your reason for leaving is crucial. If you resigned because a dream opportunity arrived, this is much better than abandoning your post because you were bored.   
  3. Is There Still Room to Grow Here? If you’re continuing to learn and develop new skills in your current job, then this can be a sign that you need to hold on for a little longer.  

 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management, software testing and Salesforce.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

5 Easy-to-Action Tips for a Productive Exit Interview

Losing a valuable employee will always be a challenging experience.  Attrition means that you need to start the complex recruitment process from scratch, and some statistics estimate that the total cost of replacing specialised employees can be equal to 400% of their annual salary 

However, saying goodbye to a team member doesn’t have to be a complete loss. Combined with resources like employee satisfaction surveys and retention feedback, an exit interview can be your opportunity to obtain useful information about what your company does well, and what you need to improve.  

In the right circumstances, an exit interview can be a powerful tool for organisational improvement. All you need to do, is learn how to use this strategy to your advantage.  

 

Exit Interviews: The Benefits to Employers and Employees  

Exit interviews give your business the opportunity to gather the insights that come from people who have spent time within your company. In other words, you can learn what people like about your business, and which factors make them more likely to resign.  

When used correctly, these “farewell” interviews can help you to reduce turnover amongst your critical professionals by addressing issues that are damaging satisfaction and engagement. For instance, if you learn that your specialists feel over-worked and unable to say no to your requests, you can implement a plan for better delegation.   

For a member of your team, the exit interview is a chance to share honest opinions, suggestions, and opinions that they might have felt uncomfortable addressing in the past. Once an employee has handed in their resignation, they’re less likely to hold back about how they really feel.  

Additionally, exit interviews can convince a ‘lost’ staff member that you respect their opinions and thoughts, which may mean that they’re more likely to become an ambassador for your brand in the future.  

So, how can you make your interview as useful as possible? 

 

1. Know What You Want to Achieve

The most successful interviews are planned with specific goals in mind. What you hope to learn from conversations will depend on yourcircumstances, but most organisations want to know why their team members leave, what suggestions they can give to help the company improve, and whether management is doing a good job.  

You might use your exit interview to: 

  • Learn about your company culture: This may include insights into relationships between colleagues, employee motivation, coordination and efficiency, and working conditions.
     
  • Improve management or leadership styles: Your interviewee can tell you if line managers aren’t investing sufficient time with team members when it comes to giving feedback, coaching recognition, and support.
     
  • Update HR benchmarks: If you discover that individuals are leaving for better benefits and salaries, you might decide to make changes to your remuneration to become more competitive.  

 

2. Plan Your Questions in Advance

With your goal in mind, you can begin to plan the questions thatwill deliver the most valuable information from the employees that have chosen to leave your business. Remember, you probably won’t have time for 20 questions, instead, you’ll need to narrow them down to keep the pressure on your staff member to a minimum. 

The exact questions you ask will depend on the circumstances, however, stick to: 

  • The main reasons why they’re leaving: Did they find a new job, get a better offer, feel like they’re not excelling in their current role, or are they frustrated that their skills are underutilised? 
  • Suggestions of how your organisation can do better: Did you need to offer more support, learning opportunities, or an improved benefits package? 
  • What did they like and dislike about the workplace? Do you need to think about adjusting your company culture? 
  • Are there any opportunities available to keep in touch?  

 

3. Make the Interview as Comfortable as Possible

The aim of most exit interviews is to gather as much useful information from the departing team member as possible. To do this, you’ll need to make sure they feel comfortable sharing their opinions with you.  

Sometimes, your best approach will be to schedule the interview with an outside consultant or a HR representative, instead of an immediate manager. Additionally, make sure that you guarantee confidentiality to let your staff know that they can speak freely.  

 

4. Learn About Where They’re Going Next

If someone in your team has been seduced by another employer, then you’ll need to find out why.The more you discover about how competitors are poaching your talent, the more you can take steps to prevent future losses.  

At the same time, knowing what attracts your employees to other pastures can help you to update your practices, and appeal to better candidates when you’re recruiting to fill the gap in your team. Remember, it’s not just about compensation. Today’s professionals are searching for job fit, culture, career growth, and opportunities.  

 

5. Stay Calm and Collected

Finally, it’s tough for any business to hear negative things about their team, their management, or their working styles. However, constructive criticism is often the only way to ensure long-term growth. Remember that your goal with an exit interview isn’t to get your staff member back.

Instead, make sure that your interviewee feels heard and respected while you gather as much information as you can. Ideally, you’ll want your departing employee to leave your company as a future customer and ambassador for your brand.  

 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management, software testing and Salesforce.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

What Makes a Great Candidate Screening Phone Interview?

A preliminary telephone interview is a useful tool for streamlining the hiring process. Screening your candidates before you invite them for a face to face interview is both efficient and cost-effective for everyone involved.  

There’s no expensive commuting, and no need to find slots in your busy schedule for numerous applicants who may not have the right skills for the role. Within 15 minutes or less, you can make sure your potential hire understands the job, meets your necessary requirements, and aligns with your company culture.  

So, how can you make the most of a phone interview when narrowing down your talent pool? 

 

The Benefits of Using Telephone Interviews 

A phone screening interview helps to separate possible employees from individuals who won’t make the final cut. It ensures you only arrange face-to-face interviews with professionals who have a good chance of being hired.  

The key is making sure you know how to use these brief conversations to your advantage. For instance, if you’re hoping to find the applicant with the best Salesforce skillset, you can use your phone interview to determine a candidate’s technology, consulting and marketing abilities. For instance, you might ask: 

  • How many years of experience the person has with Salesforce? 
  • Whether they have any specific talents that might benefit your business?
     
  • If the individual has experience using the software, you integrate with Salesforce? 

These questions will help you to set the threshold for who can be considered a “qualified hire”. If your applicant knows the basics of Salesforce, but can’t combine the platform with analytics software to help improve sales, for instance, they might not be right for you.

How Do You Structure a Phone Interview? 

Although a phone interview can be a quick and efficient way to identify possible team members, they’re also easy to get wrong without some careful preparation.  

You’ll need to think carefully about what you need for your open position. Remember, there’s more than just qualifications and technical ability to think about. If you’re desperate to fill a role as quickly as possible, you can’t pin your hopes on an applicant in need of a two-month notice period.  

Create a list of the factors that are most important to you, and your organisation, then: 

  1. Prepare your questions (keeping key talents, and requirements in mind)
     
  2. Schedule the interview at a time that’s best for everyone
     
  3. Conduct a brief, polite introduction (no more than 2 minutes)
     
  4. Ask the same questions for every interviewee
     
  5. Take notes on the answers given
     
  6. Ask follow-up questions where necessary
     
  7. Arrange the next interview with qualified candidates 

 

Which Questions Can You Ask?  

Remember to keep your screening interviews as short as possible. This will mean narrowing your questions down to only the most essential ones that give the most useful answers. Always start with screening questions that demonstrate the core skills and attributes of potential hires.  

For instance, besides questioning your possible employee about their skills with software and hardware tools, you might also ask: 

  • How far are you willing to travel for this position?
     
  • What is your current salary, and what kind of payment do you expect?
     
  • When can you start in your new role? 

Your screening questions will be determined by the position you’re recruiting for. They can help you ensure no unsuitable applicants pass the threshold into in-person interviews. Once you’ve got the answers you need, you can proceed to some other essential inquiries such as:  

1. What Prompted You to Apply for This Job?

Attitude is crucial when selecting the perfect hire. Make sure that your potential staff member sounds passionate about their role, and understands exactly what they’re signing up for. Genuine enthusiasm and recognition shows that your candidate has the potential to excel in their new career.  

 

2. What Experience Do You Have That Will Benefit This Role?

Check for evidence that your applicant has assessed the job description carefully. The perfect recruit will provide examples that show they have the right experience for the task at hand. Consider asking your interviewee to expand on their answers where necessary, to give you a deeper insight into their background.  

3. Why Did You Leave Your Previous Company?

Sometimes, learning about your candidate’s previous role and their reason for leaving can tell you volumes about how they’ll fit into your company culture. If the interviewee spends minutes complaining about their past employer, then this may be a sign that they’re not very professional. Instead, look for a team member who has been waiting patiently for the perfect position.  

 

4. What Matters Most to You About this Role?

Find out what kind of ambitions your possible employee has, and what they would like to achieve if they were lucky enough to get a job offer. This will help you to find out whether their goals and your company goals align, and whether the individual you hire will be satisfied with the position they are applying for.  

 

5. Do You Have Any Questions?

Finally, it’s essential to find out whether your candidate has any questions for you, either about the recruitment process or the role, career change they’re applying for. Fielding these queries as early as possible will help to save time for both you and your applicants.  

 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management, software testing and Salesforce.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

How to Say No at Work (Because Saying Yes Isn’t Always Possible)

For most people, saying “no” at work isn’t something that comes naturally.  

You know that saying “yes” to a new project, responsibility, or idea is generally a good way to earn the appreciation and attention of your boss. However, while there are plenty of things that you might say yes to in your career, there are also times when you’ll need put the brakes on a request.  

When you’re too busy, too overwhelmed, or you feel that the project isn’t right for your skill set, it’s important to know how you can say “no” to people you work with in a way that’s both diplomatic, and productive.   

The way you phrase your ‘no’ and the things that you do demonstrate your engagement to your boss and can have a significant impact on how people perceive you. The trick is to find out how you can adjust your responses to get the results you need, without having to say the word “no”.  

 

Step 1: Assess the Request 

Before you start thinking about how to say “no” to the people in your office, it’s worth thinking carefully about the request, and what it could mean for your future. Consider the things that you already have on your plate, and ask yourself whether priorities can be shuffled around, or whether you might be able to ask a colleague to help you.  

Sometimes, making the extra effort to say yes, even when you’re feeling a little snowed under, can be a great way to open the door to new opportunities in your profession. Evaluate all the different workarounds you might be able to use before you settle on that solid “no, thank you.” 

Step 2: Offer a Lifeline 

If you’ve considered all the options, and you need to say no, then show your company leaders that you care about their needs by offering alternative solutions. For example: 

  • If you don’t have enough time to take on another task, consider asking whether the deadline can be extended while giving your boss an insight into some of the other challenges you have piling up on your plate. This could help you come to a solution that suits both of you.
     
  • If you feel that you’re not right for the project, suggest a colleague who you believe has the right skill set. Offer to work with your colleague provided they lead giving you the opportunity to learn in a supporting role.  This shows initiative, and could also mean that you don’t have quite as much weight on your shoulders.
     
  • If you don’t agree with the approach your business is taking, offer a different solution. For instance, say “How about we do this instead…”. Back up your suggestion with facts and information based on what you know about the situation or client in question.  

Step 3: Ask for Help 

No matter your position or career choice, there’s likely to be a time in your future when you’re asked to tackle a project that you just don’t feel capable of handling.

However, asking for a little help to get you through a difficult task, could be a great way to make sure that you give your boss a favourable impression of your work ethic while embracing new skills for your future 

If you’re not sure how to handle something alone, then don’t be afraid to ask for help. Whether that means asking your boss to help you prioritise your time, or turning to one of your fellow team-members for guidance using a new piece of software, or strategy.

Decide out what you need to excel in the current situation, then ask for it.  

Step 4: Be Clear and Straightforward 

If, after some careful assessment, you still feel that saying “no” is the right course of action, the best thing you can do is be honest about your situation, and your reasoning. Holding back and refusing to tell your boss what’s really bothering you about a new opportunity, could lead to further frustration when your team leader tries to find a solution to your problem.  

To avoid unnecessary issues, be candid about what has prompted you to say no. If your reasoning is challenged, make sure that you stick to your message, and stay clear about your concerns.

For instance, if you’re worried about not having enough time for a new task, you could say: “I wouldn’t be able to do a good job with my current schedule, and that means my other projects would suffer too.”
 

Step 5: Adjust Your Expectations  

Finally, even if you’ve followed the steps outlined above carefully, it’s important to be prepared for a negative response.

Sometimes, the colleague, client, or executive that you’re saying “no” to won’t be happy with your response. However, most of the time, this won’t mean that you’re burning bridges for your future. Focus on maintaining a professional attitude, and remember that you can’t please everyone. 

 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management, software testing and Salesforce.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

What Future Job Skills will be needed to survive in a Machine automated world?

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are the buzzwords of the moment. We hear about self-driving cars and a world of automation where chatbots run call centres and respond to customer queries. Much of this technology is new to the marketplace, but predictions are that these are only the start of things to come. So where does that leave people just entering the job market? What future career prospects will our children have, and how can we prepare them to have the future job skills needed to survive in a machine dominated future?

The difference between Humans and Machines

There are many things that machines can do much better than humans, like search vast volumes of data and make mathematical calculations. But their abilities are governed by one major factor – rules. Machines work on programming and predictive learning based on historical data. If new factors come into to the mix, they are ill equipped to manage them.

Humans on the other hand are highly adaptable and can apply knowledge creatively to find solutions to new problems. This type of problem solving ability is what will be the key to humans continuing to add value in the workplace. As much as we’d like to think modern lifestyles are easy to control, plan for and schedule, there remains a high level of unpredictability to life. In addition there are many work sectors in which it will be hard to replace humans with machines. These are the things to be taken into consideration when teaching our children future job skills.

Future Job Skills lie in Human Value:
There are several types of jobs that require strong interpersonal skills and this is not something that machines can’t easily mimic. Think of social professions such as psychology or emergency services, for example.

In the event of an accident, natural disaster or fire, no one can fully understand the situation until they arrive on scene. Additionally as the situation unfolds, circumstances can change. Patients may respond well to treatment or not, what was a stable and safe environment on arrival can quickly become unsafe. Only humans can effectively manage such circumstances because they have the knowledge and instinct to be able to make decisions and adapt according to the circumstances. This highlights an important future job skill: The ability to think on your feet and adapt knowledge and decision making to changing circumstances.

A second important future job skill is visualisation and planning – the ability to create perspective, design, create and coordinate ideas so that they become reality. Architects, engineers, even graphic designers and advertising agencies require human creativity and this is a skill worth developing. Machines may be able to take over many tasks, but it is still human thinking that envisioned them doing that in the first place. Creativity, design, and engineering are important future job skills that humans do best.

Nature and nurture – there is a limit to how much we (or machines) can control the natural world and because of that there will always be opportunities for humans to step in and make a Future job skillsdifference. The environment remains constantly in flux. One only has to view the ever changing weather patterns to see that. As much as we’d like to use equipment to predict what will happen, in the end, nature remains unpredictably in control.

Careers involved in the environmental sector will rely on human expertise from conservation, through to legal management and control as well as the field of medicine. Despite advances, new bugs and diseases consistently appear and old viruses re-emerge, stronger than ever. The human body responds individually to treatments with emotional and mental influences proving to be just as important as physiological factors. As a result, humans will remain valuable in the field of natural sciences. Related future job skills may include scientific knowledge and study, social skills, legal skills as well as management and understanding all varieties of interlinked ecosystems.

Business and economics is another field that remains largely unpredictable. While markets may be manipulated and influenced, consumers react of their own accord, and because they are human the outcomes can never truly be certain. Take last year’s Brexit vote for example. Nobody thought the result would be “no”, and economic predictions based on that result were ominous. Yet many of those fears have proven to be unfounded. While certain sectors took a knock, others have shown to be resilient, growing exponentially despite conservative economic movements. Business thinking, particularly in the entrepreneurial realm will remain important future job skills, as well as that of managers, analysts and economists.

In the future there will be many opportunities to work with machines to achieve better outcomes, and there will also be careers and areas of expertise that will remain firmly in human hands. Rather than fear machines and the impact they may have, the most important future job skills may involve using instinctive human potential to think creatively and seek out opportunities even where there appear to only be challenges.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Take control of your own Personal Development

As new generations enter the workforce, many jobseekers look for work opportunities in companies that will help with their own personal development. But whose responsibility is this really? Is itHuman Capital Management personal development up to employers to provide training or should individuals be taking the initiative if they want to progress in their career?

In terms of Human Capital Management, business are recognising that they do have an important role to play. When they invest in their staff and create a stimulating work environment, it helps to reduce attrition and increases employee engagement which often results in greater productivity. This helps them to retain and develop top talent that contributes to the company success. So it is in a company’s interests to provide training and career development opportunities.

The Development Dilemma

The problem is that often employees will complete the training and gain the benefit from it and then move on elsewhere, so the money and time invested in those employees is benefiting someone else and not the company who provided the training. This dilemma results in companies being selective on who they provide training to, often choosing to invest in employees that show themselves to be proactive and interested in adding more value to the business as well as their own personal development.

One method that companies are in investing in terms of human capital management is gamification. This incorporates self-directed learning into a gaming type platform. It allows employees to create their own persona online, register for and complete training in their own time and gain recognition for their efforts. It’s proving to be a valuable tool because those employees that are really invested in personal development have the opportunity to complete additional training modules and further their own knowledge while at the same time encouraging others to do the same by their example.

But what if the company you work for does not provide these opportunities, or limits them to a select few senior staff? How can you progress in your personal development so that you’re consistently building your career? Here are our top 3 tips:

Set Goals and Objectives

Give some thought as to where you want to me in the short, medium and long term. What type of Human Capital Management role to do you see yourself fulfilling in 5-10 year’s time or by the end of the year? What are the stepping stones to get there? What skills or type of experience will you need and how can you accomplish that?

Asking these questions will help you set clear goals and personal objectives. Remember too, the golden rules of goal setting: Goals should be specific, measurable, action-oriented, reasonable and time-based. Start with weekly goals, setting milestones that are a starting point to reach your long term human capital management goals.

Breaking bigger goals into bite sized chunks not only helps to keep you on track, it’s also extremely rewarding to tick off tasks. It gives you a sense of accomplishment which encourages you to keep moving towards your bigger personal development goals.

Coaching and Mentoring

Find someone who can mentor you and don’t underestimate the value of this. If you have some budget available you may want to invest in a personal or business coach. However, keep in mind that this is the type of relationship that will develop over time and could get quite costly if you choose to have regular weekly or monthly meet up sessions. A coach is someone who is trained (and certified) to help guide you in making decisions and helping you uncover what’s most important to you so that you can then direct your personal development efforts into specific areas of your life.

Mentoring on the other hand may be offered free of charge in an organisation or on an industry forum. This is where more senior people freely give of their time and input and are there to listen to your questions and provide advice based on their personal experience. This could be a senior colleague, manager or even director in the firm.

Keep in mind that a mentor needn’t be someone you meet with in person. You could connect with someone in your industry online and have video chats as mentoring sessions, or have a set up where you can communicate over email or chat.

Finally, there is also the option of reading inspirational stories and books by leading business and industry personalities. These books can provide valuable insights on how they achieved success that you can incorporate into your personal development and goal setting.

Beat the Imposter Phenomenon

Many people don’t progress in their careers, not because they don’t have the skills and abilities, but rather because they don’t believe in themselves. They live with a sense that they’re an imposter and soon someone will find out that they aren’t all they’re supposed to be. Part of personal development is recognising your skills and value you can contribute to a business. Believe in yourself and that you’re worth investing in, because if you do, others will too.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

So…tell me about yourself?

Jobseekers talking about themselvesIt may seem an obvious question for an interview but it’s one that most jobseekers dread. “What should I share? How much should I share? If I talk about myself too much I may come across as arrogant. If I don’t share enough they will think I lack confidence.”

I’m often surprised how unprepared jobseekers are for this question. Maybe because it is so broad and they aren’t quite sure where to start. So here’s my tip: Think marketing. Think of yourself as a product that you need to present in a way that makes the other person sit up and think “Hey that’s exactly what I need!”

Here are some marketing questions to help you prepare your answers:

Who am I? (Personality)
Often personality is as much a factor as skills or experience in finding the person that is the right fit for a team. With this question you want to be sharing your values and what’s important to you. Things like being a good team member or leader, someone who likes to creatively solve problems or enjoys collaborating. Think about what the interviewer might be looking for in a jobseeker and align that with your strongest personality traits.

What is my experience? (Background)
Your past work and life experience creates a backdrop for the rest of your marketing story. This is where you can highlight key projects you worked on and what you enjoyed most about them. Be sure to highlight specific challenges faced and how they were overcome. Travel, hobbies and interests can also be featured here as they will provide a broader view of your life experience.

What am I good at? (Features)
As a jobseeker you need to showcase what you can do in terms of specific skills so that the interviewer can tick the boxes if you align with what they are looking for. Be specific and link your skills to your experience to demonstrate that you really do know what you’re talking about.

What have I achieved? (Benefits)
For every skill or feature you list about yourself, link it to a benefit for the employer – either past or future. For example: “By streamlining the project rollout, implementation was achieved in 3 months instead of 5 months saving the company X amount in implementation costs.” Always think in terms of: “What’s in it for them?” because this is what will get their attention.

What do I want? (Mutual benefits)
Interviewers are interested in what jobseekers are looking for because this is a big factor in how long they will stay with the company. Be honest in your expectations, but make sure they are grounded in reality. Link your expectations into why you applied for the position and want to work for the company. If you show that you are sold on the company and eager to contribute you are already half way into marketing yourself into the job.

As a final tip, keep in mind the perspective of the interviewer and market yourself to them. (What are they looking for, what do they want?) This will help prevent you getting too self-conscious when trying to talk about yourself. Put yourself forward as not just a jobseeker, but someone they really can’t afford to be without.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Are Longer Notice Periods a Good Thing?

Recently we have seen a trend towards longer notice periods. In particular in the IT Workday industry the norm has become 3 months. But not everyone in the industry is convinced that this is a Workday Notice Periodgood thing. Indeed for both employers and employees there are pros and cons which could affect not only the working relationship but also the business concerned.

The Employers Perspective

With systems like Workday, high level expertise can be hard to find. Which means that employers want to try hold on to that expertise as long as possible and have sufficient time to search for a replacement if an employee decides to leave. Generally it can take three months or more to find someone suitable. Then there is also the question of handover. This is not something that can be done in a week or two so from an employer’s perspective a notice period of three months or more is the minimum they would need to ensure continuity in business projects.

However, this can also present challenges. Once a Workday employee has made a decision to leave they tend to emotionally disconnect. This often reflects in their work and interactions with clients and colleagues. Instead of just causing a disruption in workflow it can also cause a decline in morale which could in some instances instigate a mass exodus in the team, especially if the person leaving has a fair amount of influence or is looked up to by colleagues. This could be far more damaging to the business than losing the expertise of just that one Workday person.
Sometimes, despite how valuable a person is in the role they fulfill, it may be in the business’ best interests to get them out as soon as possible, rather than let them stay on. This is particularly important when there is a chance the employee could take client accounts with them to a competitor or be looking at starting up their own enterprise.

The Employees Perspective

Some employees want to leave on good terms and give their Workday employers the benefit of the doubt by working out a full three month notice period. They recognize the complexities involved in projects and are willing to work the full notice period in order to help train up their replacement and conduct a proper handover.

Sometimes employees are even willing to give more notice than required. However, they need to be cautious. If the Workday employer thinks they don’t need the extra notice they can terminate with just the required notice period and employee could then find themselves without pay for a month or two before they start their new job. There is also the challenge of coordinating start dates with a new employer and ensuring they’d be willing to wait for three months or more.

Ultimately it will come down to the Workday employment contract and the relationship between the employer and employee. It’s always best to leave on good terms as one never knows when past relationships could impact business dealings or opportunities in the future. With open communications and good working relationships, it is possible to have a positive outcome for all.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Hey Sister, Will You Mention Pay at Your Mid-Year Review?

Last year, on average women in America, received 80 cents for every dollar a man earned. The gender wage gap is a real, and significant concern for today’s professionals, and in the UK, it’s hard not to direct our focus towards the tech industry when we’re evaluating inequality.  

Females in the UK technology industry receive, on average, 16% less than their male counterparts. On top of that, tech companies inherently struggle to hire and retain female employees.  

Today, a survey into 750 organisations across the tech industry found that the sector had the biggest gender pay gap problem in the UK, with most women being paid at least 6% less for the same jobs.  

This seems to go against the suggestion that women simply aren’t holding enough senior positions to bridge the divide.  

Are Tech Careers Geared Towards Men? 

Women make up about half of our UK workforce. In America, they’re the primary “breadwinner” for about 40% of households, and in some families, they’re the only source of consistent income. Yet, despite all this, women are still earning less than men.  

Part of the issue in the tech industry may be the fact that most employers are gearing their job posts towards the male population, without realizing it. According to one analytic study of job posts across all industries found that 70% of job posts included “masculine” terms like “dominant”. In the technology sector, the commonality of masculine words rose to 92%.  

Although words might not seem powerful enough to make a difference to hiring decisions, the same studies found that job ads using gender-neutral words received 42% more applications. The indication is that women may be less likely to apply to positions with job listings that include masculine words.  

Taking Control of the Wage Gap 

Another common problem that may be responsible for the perseverance of the pay gap in the technology industry is the unwillingness that women show when it comes to asking for salary rises. According to tech leader, Sheryl Sandberg, it’s time for technology companies to start supporting women’s rights for higher remuneration. She believes that today’s female professionals underestimate their worth, and fail to ask for the income they deserve.  

Currently, Forbes estimates that Sandberg is worth about £1.3 million, but even she struggled when first starting out in the tech industry. During her time at Harvard, Sheryl noticed that women were more likely to underestimate themselves than men, meaning that they’re less likely to put themselves forward for a pay rise.  

Research supports this concept, as one study revealed that there’s a strong connection between the salaries that job candidates ask for and the income they receive. Unfortunately, negotiations for salary often work against women.  

When looking into the roles that males and females are given after an initial offer, the study found that women set their expectations for pay lower than men 68% of the time, and ask for about 4% less than their male counterparts 

On top of that, the same research found that women are under-represented in the interview pool two-thirds of the time, and when women do make it to the next stage of a job interview, they often receive lower salary offers than those given to men for the same job. This difference occurs 63% of the time.  

Age and the Income Gap 

One interesting thing to note about the wage gap in the technology industry is that as professionals age in the workforce, their salary gap decreases. For women and men that enter the technology field between the ages of 18 and 25, there’s a 29% difference in wages. However, by the time professionals are 50 or older, the pay gap is only 5%.  

From one perspective, the reducing gap makes sense, as people receive higher salaries the more experience they earn. However, this explanation doesn’t serve to outline why there’s such a significant difference between men and women in the first place. One possible answer may come in the fact that many employers ask their candidates about the wages they received in previous posts.  

By asking about past renumeration packages, companies in the technology industry could be unintentionally setting women up for a lifetime of trying to achieve the same income as their male counterpart. Often, the wages of the past are used to determine the income of the future, as hiring managers can make decisions on a candidate’s value based on their past earnings. However, women often earn less than men in their first job, meaning that they start behind, and spend the remainder of their careers trying to catch up.  

Bridging the Gap 

The key thing to remember about the gender pay gap is that it doesn’t exist because women aren’t ambitious or educated enough to pursue the same jobs as their male counterparts. Instead, the problem exists in the pre-standing structural barriers that hold women back. Women aren’t earning less because they’re less experienced than men. In fact, colleges have seen more female candidates than male apply for the last thirty years.  

Today, it’s time for technology companies to address the differences, and start bridging the gap, for a more diverse workforce.  

The first step could involve women simply addressing the obvious difference in pay during their mid-year review.  

Ready to take a stand girl? 

 

About Resource On Demand 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs. 

 

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.