What Future Job Skills will be needed to survive in a Machine automated world?

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are the buzzwords of the moment. We hear about self-driving cars and a world of automation where chatbots run call centres and respond to customer queries. Much of this technology is new to the marketplace, but predictions are that these are only the start of things to come. So where does that leave people just entering the job market? What future career prospects will our children have, and how can we prepare them to have the future job skills needed to survive in a machine dominated future?

The difference between Humans and Machines

There are many things that machines can do much better than humans, like search vast volumes of data and make mathematical calculations. But their abilities are governed by one major factor – rules. Machines work on programming and predictive learning based on historical data. If new factors come into to the mix, they are ill equipped to manage them.

Humans on the other hand are highly adaptable and can apply knowledge creatively to find solutions to new problems. This type of problem solving ability is what will be the key to humans continuing to add value in the workplace. As much as we’d like to think modern lifestyles are easy to control, plan for and schedule, there remains a high level of unpredictability to life. In addition there are many work sectors in which it will be hard to replace humans with machines. These are the things to be taken into consideration when teaching our children future job skills.

Future Job Skills lie in Human Value:
There are several types of jobs that require strong interpersonal skills and this is not something that machines can’t easily mimic. Think of social professions such as psychology or emergency services, for example.

In the event of an accident, natural disaster or fire, no one can fully understand the situation until they arrive on scene. Additionally as the situation unfolds, circumstances can change. Patients may respond well to treatment or not, what was a stable and safe environment on arrival can quickly become unsafe. Only humans can effectively manage such circumstances because they have the knowledge and instinct to be able to make decisions and adapt according to the circumstances. This highlights an important future job skill: The ability to think on your feet and adapt knowledge and decision making to changing circumstances.

A second important future job skill is visualisation and planning – the ability to create perspective, design, create and coordinate ideas so that they become reality. Architects, engineers, even graphic designers and advertising agencies require human creativity and this is a skill worth developing. Machines may be able to take over many tasks, but it is still human thinking that envisioned them doing that in the first place. Creativity, design, and engineering are important future job skills that humans do best.

Nature and nurture – there is a limit to how much we (or machines) can control the natural world and because of that there will always be opportunities for humans to step in and make a Future job skillsdifference. The environment remains constantly in flux. One only has to view the ever changing weather patterns to see that. As much as we’d like to use equipment to predict what will happen, in the end, nature remains unpredictably in control.

Careers involved in the environmental sector will rely on human expertise from conservation, through to legal management and control as well as the field of medicine. Despite advances, new bugs and diseases consistently appear and old viruses re-emerge, stronger than ever. The human body responds individually to treatments with emotional and mental influences proving to be just as important as physiological factors. As a result, humans will remain valuable in the field of natural sciences. Related future job skills may include scientific knowledge and study, social skills, legal skills as well as management and understanding all varieties of interlinked ecosystems.

Business and economics is another field that remains largely unpredictable. While markets may be manipulated and influenced, consumers react of their own accord, and because they are human the outcomes can never truly be certain. Take last year’s Brexit vote for example. Nobody thought the result would be “no”, and economic predictions based on that result were ominous. Yet many of those fears have proven to be unfounded. While certain sectors took a knock, others have shown to be resilient, growing exponentially despite conservative economic movements. Business thinking, particularly in the entrepreneurial realm will remain important future job skills, as well as that of managers, analysts and economists.

In the future there will be many opportunities to work with machines to achieve better outcomes, and there will also be careers and areas of expertise that will remain firmly in human hands. Rather than fear machines and the impact they may have, the most important future job skills may involve using instinctive human potential to think creatively and seek out opportunities even where there appear to only be challenges.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Take control of your own Personal Development

As new generations enter the workforce, many jobseekers look for work opportunities in companies that will help with their own personal development. But whose responsibility is this really? Is itHuman Capital Management personal development up to employers to provide training or should individuals be taking the initiative if they want to progress in their career?

In terms of Human Capital Management, business are recognising that they do have an important role to play. When they invest in their staff and create a stimulating work environment, it helps to reduce attrition and increases employee engagement which often results in greater productivity. This helps them to retain and develop top talent that contributes to the company success. So it is in a company’s interests to provide training and career development opportunities.

The Development Dilemma

The problem is that often employees will complete the training and gain the benefit from it and then move on elsewhere, so the money and time invested in those employees is benefiting someone else and not the company who provided the training. This dilemma results in companies being selective on who they provide training to, often choosing to invest in employees that show themselves to be proactive and interested in adding more value to the business as well as their own personal development.

One method that companies are in investing in terms of human capital management is gamification. This incorporates self-directed learning into a gaming type platform. It allows employees to create their own persona online, register for and complete training in their own time and gain recognition for their efforts. It’s proving to be a valuable tool because those employees that are really invested in personal development have the opportunity to complete additional training modules and further their own knowledge while at the same time encouraging others to do the same by their example.

But what if the company you work for does not provide these opportunities, or limits them to a select few senior staff? How can you progress in your personal development so that you’re consistently building your career? Here are our top 3 tips:

Set Goals and Objectives

Give some thought as to where you want to me in the short, medium and long term. What type of Human Capital Management role to do you see yourself fulfilling in 5-10 year’s time or by the end of the year? What are the stepping stones to get there? What skills or type of experience will you need and how can you accomplish that?

Asking these questions will help you set clear goals and personal objectives. Remember too, the golden rules of goal setting: Goals should be specific, measurable, action-oriented, reasonable and time-based. Start with weekly goals, setting milestones that are a starting point to reach your long term human capital management goals.

Breaking bigger goals into bite sized chunks not only helps to keep you on track, it’s also extremely rewarding to tick off tasks. It gives you a sense of accomplishment which encourages you to keep moving towards your bigger personal development goals.

Coaching and Mentoring

Find someone who can mentor you and don’t underestimate the value of this. If you have some budget available you may want to invest in a personal or business coach. However, keep in mind that this is the type of relationship that will develop over time and could get quite costly if you choose to have regular weekly or monthly meet up sessions. A coach is someone who is trained (and certified) to help guide you in making decisions and helping you uncover what’s most important to you so that you can then direct your personal development efforts into specific areas of your life.

Mentoring on the other hand may be offered free of charge in an organisation or on an industry forum. This is where more senior people freely give of their time and input and are there to listen to your questions and provide advice based on their personal experience. This could be a senior colleague, manager or even director in the firm.

Keep in mind that a mentor needn’t be someone you meet with in person. You could connect with someone in your industry online and have video chats as mentoring sessions, or have a set up where you can communicate over email or chat.

Finally, there is also the option of reading inspirational stories and books by leading business and industry personalities. These books can provide valuable insights on how they achieved success that you can incorporate into your personal development and goal setting.

Beat the Imposter Phenomenon

Many people don’t progress in their careers, not because they don’t have the skills and abilities, but rather because they don’t believe in themselves. They live with a sense that they’re an imposter and soon someone will find out that they aren’t all they’re supposed to be. Part of personal development is recognising your skills and value you can contribute to a business. Believe in yourself and that you’re worth investing in, because if you do, others will too.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

So…tell me about yourself?

Jobseekers talking about themselvesIt may seem an obvious question for an interview but it’s one that most jobseekers dread. “What should I share? How much should I share? If I talk about myself too much I may come across as arrogant. If I don’t share enough they will think I lack confidence.”

I’m often surprised how unprepared jobseekers are for this question. Maybe because it is so broad and they aren’t quite sure where to start. So here’s my tip: Think marketing. Think of yourself as a product that you need to present in a way that makes the other person sit up and think “Hey that’s exactly what I need!”

Here are some marketing questions to help you prepare your answers:

Who am I? (Personality)
Often personality is as much a factor as skills or experience in finding the person that is the right fit for a team. With this question you want to be sharing your values and what’s important to you. Things like being a good team member or leader, someone who likes to creatively solve problems or enjoys collaborating. Think about what the interviewer might be looking for in a jobseeker and align that with your strongest personality traits.

What is my experience? (Background)
Your past work and life experience creates a backdrop for the rest of your marketing story. This is where you can highlight key projects you worked on and what you enjoyed most about them. Be sure to highlight specific challenges faced and how they were overcome. Travel, hobbies and interests can also be featured here as they will provide a broader view of your life experience.

What am I good at? (Features)
As a jobseeker you need to showcase what you can do in terms of specific skills so that the interviewer can tick the boxes if you align with what they are looking for. Be specific and link your skills to your experience to demonstrate that you really do know what you’re talking about.

What have I achieved? (Benefits)
For every skill or feature you list about yourself, link it to a benefit for the employer – either past or future. For example: “By streamlining the project rollout, implementation was achieved in 3 months instead of 5 months saving the company X amount in implementation costs.” Always think in terms of: “What’s in it for them?” because this is what will get their attention.

What do I want? (Mutual benefits)
Interviewers are interested in what jobseekers are looking for because this is a big factor in how long they will stay with the company. Be honest in your expectations, but make sure they are grounded in reality. Link your expectations into why you applied for the position and want to work for the company. If you show that you are sold on the company and eager to contribute you are already half way into marketing yourself into the job.

As a final tip, keep in mind the perspective of the interviewer and market yourself to them. (What are they looking for, what do they want?) This will help prevent you getting too self-conscious when trying to talk about yourself. Put yourself forward as not just a jobseeker, but someone they really can’t afford to be without.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Are Longer Notice Periods a Good Thing?

Recently we have seen a trend towards longer notice periods. In particular in the IT Workday industry the norm has become 3 months. But not everyone in the industry is convinced that this is a Workday Notice Periodgood thing. Indeed for both employers and employees there are pros and cons which could affect not only the working relationship but also the business concerned.

The Employers Perspective

With systems like Workday, high level expertise can be hard to find. Which means that employers want to try hold on to that expertise as long as possible and have sufficient time to search for a replacement if an employee decides to leave. Generally it can take three months or more to find someone suitable. Then there is also the question of handover. This is not something that can be done in a week or two so from an employer’s perspective a notice period of three months or more is the minimum they would need to ensure continuity in business projects.

However, this can also present challenges. Once a Workday employee has made a decision to leave they tend to emotionally disconnect. This often reflects in their work and interactions with clients and colleagues. Instead of just causing a disruption in workflow it can also cause a decline in morale which could in some instances instigate a mass exodus in the team, especially if the person leaving has a fair amount of influence or is looked up to by colleagues. This could be far more damaging to the business than losing the expertise of just that one Workday person.
Sometimes, despite how valuable a person is in the role they fulfill, it may be in the business’ best interests to get them out as soon as possible, rather than let them stay on. This is particularly important when there is a chance the employee could take client accounts with them to a competitor or be looking at starting up their own enterprise.

The Employees Perspective

Some employees want to leave on good terms and give their Workday employers the benefit of the doubt by working out a full three month notice period. They recognize the complexities involved in projects and are willing to work the full notice period in order to help train up their replacement and conduct a proper handover.

Sometimes employees are even willing to give more notice than required. However, they need to be cautious. If the Workday employer thinks they don’t need the extra notice they can terminate with just the required notice period and employee could then find themselves without pay for a month or two before they start their new job. There is also the challenge of coordinating start dates with a new employer and ensuring they’d be willing to wait for three months or more.

Ultimately it will come down to the Workday employment contract and the relationship between the employer and employee. It’s always best to leave on good terms as one never knows when past relationships could impact business dealings or opportunities in the future. With open communications and good working relationships, it is possible to have a positive outcome for all.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Hey Sister, Will You Mention Pay at Your Mid-Year Review?

Last year, on average women in America, received 80 cents for every dollar a man earned. The gender wage gap is a real, and significant concern for today’s professionals, and in the UK, it’s hard not to direct our focus towards the tech industry when we’re evaluating inequality.  

Females in the UK technology industry receive, on average, 16% less than their male counterparts. On top of that, tech companies inherently struggle to hire and retain female employees.  

Today, a survey into 750 organisations across the tech industry found that the sector had the biggest gender pay gap problem in the UK, with most women being paid at least 6% less for the same jobs.  

This seems to go against the suggestion that women simply aren’t holding enough senior positions to bridge the divide.  

Are Tech Careers Geared Towards Men? 

Women make up about half of our UK workforce. In America, they’re the primary “breadwinner” for about 40% of households, and in some families, they’re the only source of consistent income. Yet, despite all this, women are still earning less than men.  

Part of the issue in the tech industry may be the fact that most employers are gearing their job posts towards the male population, without realizing it. According to one analytic study of job posts across all industries found that 70% of job posts included “masculine” terms like “dominant”. In the technology sector, the commonality of masculine words rose to 92%.  

Although words might not seem powerful enough to make a difference to hiring decisions, the same studies found that job ads using gender-neutral words received 42% more applications. The indication is that women may be less likely to apply to positions with job listings that include masculine words.  

Taking Control of the Wage Gap 

Another common problem that may be responsible for the perseverance of the pay gap in the technology industry is the unwillingness that women show when it comes to asking for salary rises. According to tech leader, Sheryl Sandberg, it’s time for technology companies to start supporting women’s rights for higher remuneration. She believes that today’s female professionals underestimate their worth, and fail to ask for the income they deserve.  

Currently, Forbes estimates that Sandberg is worth about £1.3 million, but even she struggled when first starting out in the tech industry. During her time at Harvard, Sheryl noticed that women were more likely to underestimate themselves than men, meaning that they’re less likely to put themselves forward for a pay rise.  

Research supports this concept, as one study revealed that there’s a strong connection between the salaries that job candidates ask for and the income they receive. Unfortunately, negotiations for salary often work against women.  

When looking into the roles that males and females are given after an initial offer, the study found that women set their expectations for pay lower than men 68% of the time, and ask for about 4% less than their male counterparts 

On top of that, the same research found that women are under-represented in the interview pool two-thirds of the time, and when women do make it to the next stage of a job interview, they often receive lower salary offers than those given to men for the same job. This difference occurs 63% of the time.  

Age and the Income Gap 

One interesting thing to note about the wage gap in the technology industry is that as professionals age in the workforce, their salary gap decreases. For women and men that enter the technology field between the ages of 18 and 25, there’s a 29% difference in wages. However, by the time professionals are 50 or older, the pay gap is only 5%.  

From one perspective, the reducing gap makes sense, as people receive higher salaries the more experience they earn. However, this explanation doesn’t serve to outline why there’s such a significant difference between men and women in the first place. One possible answer may come in the fact that many employers ask their candidates about the wages they received in previous posts.  

By asking about past renumeration packages, companies in the technology industry could be unintentionally setting women up for a lifetime of trying to achieve the same income as their male counterpart. Often, the wages of the past are used to determine the income of the future, as hiring managers can make decisions on a candidate’s value based on their past earnings. However, women often earn less than men in their first job, meaning that they start behind, and spend the remainder of their careers trying to catch up.  

Bridging the Gap 

The key thing to remember about the gender pay gap is that it doesn’t exist because women aren’t ambitious or educated enough to pursue the same jobs as their male counterparts. Instead, the problem exists in the pre-standing structural barriers that hold women back. Women aren’t earning less because they’re less experienced than men. In fact, colleges have seen more female candidates than male apply for the last thirty years.  

Today, it’s time for technology companies to address the differences, and start bridging the gap, for a more diverse workforce.  

The first step could involve women simply addressing the obvious difference in pay during their mid-year review.  

Ready to take a stand girl? 

 

About Resource On Demand 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs. 

 

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com. 

The New Remote Control

There is one distinct advantage that technology has brought to the workplace – the ability to connect remotely and work from just about anywhere in the world. This is providing both businessesRemote Workforce and employees greater flexibility. Not only can employees work from home or off site locations, but organisations can access talent and expertise from around the world. (Sometimes even making use of time zone differences to improve project continuity and efficiency.)

However, engaging a remote workforce is not without its challenges, especially as many organisations use old outdated technology for project collaboration. Email is great for one-on-one communication but can get messy when there are multiple recipients. Similarly multiple people working on the same spreadsheets can make it difficult to determine which one is most up to date.

Research shows that team members on average use five different tools to manage projects which is not the most efficient way of doing things as the lack of integration can hinder collaboration. Does this mean that old technology should make way for new? Or should businesses rather rethink their remote control?

Keys for successful remote working

To make the concept of a remote workforce more efficient, organisations need to have a clearer understanding of what tools are available that will facilitate better collaboration. Here are some key elements to consider:

Project Management – A cloud based centralized system can help facilitate better project management by improving security, workflows and management ability. Individual projects can be coordinated through virtual office hubs that manage the remote workforce. At any given time project managers can update clients on project progress and see who is working on specific tasks. Gantt charts can be incorporated into the cloud based project management system to facilitate this.

Planning and scheduling – Tied in with project management is the ability to schedule tasks for remote workforce members according to their specific expertise within the centralised cloud system. Online team planning meetings can be coordinated and outcomes can be linked into the project schedule.

Document sharing – One of the biggest challenges is when people are simultaneously working on documents and at the end of the day it’s difficult to determine what’s the latest updated version. Cloud based document sharing can track who makes what changes while viewing the latest version. Some technologies allow different levels of access for people in different roles which improves document integrity and security.

Task coordination – Kanban boards with specific remote workforce member tasks resemble small post-it notes can be linked into the Gantt charts. This enables team members and managers to view tasks at a glance and see progress. It can also help manage workloads and identify who may be available to take on new tasks, or who needs help with their workload.

While there are many cloud based systems available, organisations need to be careful about choosing one that is specific to their needs. Many promise nice sounding optional extras but in reality the simpler the remote workforce management tools the more likely team members are to use them and the easier it will be to co-ordinate projects.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Preventing Salesforce Career Stagnation

The traditional model of career progression was: learn as skill, get a job, get promoted, become a manager, then keep that job until you retire. The problem with that is that not only does it limit opportunities, but it’s also a fast recipe for stagnation. If you’re only developing skills and experience in one specific Salesforce niche, chances are at some point you’ll get bored, but with no option for upward progression you may feel stuck. And this is especially an issue when industries or technologies start to mature.

In the UK, Salesforce is starting to reach a level of maturity. Have you considered that maybe it’s time to move on and gain some fresh experience to prevent career stagnation? Despite what you may think, the best careers are those that are not linear. It’s not always about moving up, sometimes a side step or even a backwards step is the best career move you can make because it can lead to new and often better opportunities. Here are our three top tips for preventing career stagnation:

1. Always be learning

This goes far beyond the basics of fulfilling a Salesforce job in terms of development, integration or coding. When you are conscious about learning you are always on the lookout for opportunities to do so, and this in itself is what opens many doors. Even a lunch time chat with a junior colleague may highlight an area they are struggling with. It can plant an idea, open up an opportunity to collaborate and find solutions that don’t yet exist. If you document your problem solving methods and solutions, it can provide a framework for future learning, both for yourself and juniors.
Broaden your horizons by reading books, joining forums and sharing ideas with people in similar roles. As you gain expertise, share your knowledge, because not only does this help build your professional profile, but also helps to raise the bar on the complexities and challenges you get to tackle.

Learn skills beyond standard Salesforce jobs and IT, such as project management or change management. With architecture and technology changing rapidly, these are skills that managers need for successful project implementation.

Look to other industries. While being in the hub of an IT company may seem like the ideal environment for career progression, the reality is that all industries are IT dependent and as such there are opportunities to use your experience to make a big impact in other niche industries. The healthcare industry, insurance industry, retail, NGO’s, even government organisations are becoming more focused on technology to become more efficient.

2. Play to your strengths

There’s a saying: “You’ll never get bored if you’re doing what you love!” So find what you love to do and develop your skills around that. Knowing yourself and playing to your strengths can Salesforce Jobscontribute greatly to career satisfaction. Why? Because then you’re not simply doing what everyone else says you should be doing, or fitting in with what the organisation expects you to do. You’re building your Salesforce career not just doing another job.

IT professionals are often expected to work long hours in big open office environments with pressing deadlines and this can be a recipe for burnout. By knowing how you work best, and what environment makes you most productive, you can seek out other Salesforce jobs that offer what you need, instead of simply accepting what you can get.

3. Stay connected

Whether you attend conferences and seminars or engage on online forums, staying connected is a great way to develop your Salesforce career. You not only constantly stay abreast of what is happening in the industry, but you also have the opportunity of sharing knowledge with like-minded individuals.

Staying connected also helps you to keep moving forward as technology advances and creates opportunities to integrate the old with the new. Many new technologies are simply improvements or built on older proven technologies so expertise and knowledge is seldom wasted. One of the biggest challenges companies face is keeping up with technology developments. Staying connected on a personal level to other experts in the industry can provide valuable insights from other organisations as to how they overcame implementation challenges.

Finally, know that your Salesforce career is what you make it. It’s a platform offering a great deal of diversity and opportunities and suited to people of varying skills, expertise and personalities. Connect, collaborate and always be learning and you’ll find many opportunities to avoid stagnation and develop your Salesforce career. And if all else fails, speak to our expert Salesforce recruiters to give your career a boost!!

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Who Can Help Fast Track Your Career? A Mentor, Sponsor, or Both?

The chances are you know all about using mentors as a resource for guiding your career, but do you recognise the value of sponsors too? If you really want to get ahead in the competitive career marketplace, then you may need to consider seeking different types of guidance.

While a mentor can help you to develop your career, and inspire you towards your goals, a sponsor offers unique skills that could make you even more competitive in your space. While mentors and sponsors are frequently confused with each other, they offer very different benefits. Additionally, while there may be countless mentors in the world, sponsors are much harder to come by.

Here, we’ll help you understand the difference between a mentor, and a sponsor, and decide whether you need one, the other, or both.

What’s the Difference Between a Mentor and Sponsor?

So, what’s the difference between a sponsor and a mentor? A mentor is someone who helps you to understand your position in a specific industry. He or she can help you navigate the unwritten rules of a marketplace, and recognise the strengths you have in your role. In some cases, a mentor might even help you to pinpoint your future career goals. Mentors are most helpful for people who are just getting started in their career. They offer advice for helping you take the next step in your professional life, and steer you around any potential hurdles you might face.

A sponsor, on the other hand, is someone who generally works in an influential role within your organisation. This is a person who’s happy to advocate for you, and sing your praises where necessary to give you access to brand-new opportunities. Sponsors can help you to connect to new career opportunities, by recommending you for crucial assignments and helping you to establish relationships with other influential people.

What are the Benefits of Having a Mentor?

Mentors are a fantastic source of knowledge for the budding professional. These people fully understand the culture of the company that you work for, and can provide you with plenty of valuable knowledge. However, you’ll need to choose your mentor with care, the traditional choice is a leader in your business with a great track record, and a clear vision for the future.

Mentors benefit their mentees by:

  • Providing you with limitless confidence because they see your potential, and help you to harness it.
  • Guiding you towards success and helping you to avoid the mistakes they might have encountered at the beginning of their career.
  • Giving you a reality check and asking you to answer difficult questions in the pursuit of your professional goals

 

What are the Benefits of Having a Sponsor?

According to a study by the Centre for Talent Innovation, people with sponsors have a 23% greater chance of excelling in their careers, compared to people without sponsors. Sponsorship isn’t as well-known as mentoring, but it can be just as important. After all, a sponsor can put you forward for new positions, and act as your advocate as you move towards new things.

Sponsors benefit their protegees by:

  • Helping you to pinpoint your goals, and then opening the doors to those goals with recommendations, advocacy and more.
  • Ensuring you connect with the right people by connecting you with a wide network of influential professionals in your industry.
  • Showcasing you to the world and helping you to discover new opportunities you may be unable to access alone.

Do You Need Both a Mentor and a Sponsor?

For most people, mentors and sponsors will both represent key elements of workplace advancement, but these professionals rarely come in a single person. As the job market becomes increasingly more competitive, people who can develop sponsor and mentor relationships will be best prepared to perform exceptionally in their roles.

Both sponsors and mentors can be crucial to maximising career growth, and they may represent some of the most important relationships in your career. When introduced to each other, your mentor and your sponsor can create a formidable team that are devoted to helping you reach your maximum potential.

How can You Find your Sponsor?

Finding a mentor is easy enough, as you simply need to approach someone you admire within your industry. However, finding a sponsor is not quite as simple.

The important thing to remember about sponsorship, is that it’s a two-way street. While your sponsor will make you look good by accentuating your strengths, and giving you new opportunities to shine, you’ll have to make your sponsor look good by excelling in everything you do. Perhaps the easiest way to begin looking for a sponsor is to start networking in your industry, but you should also focus on being incredibly high-performing in your role.

Tackle significant challenges in your industry head-on, and make sure that people in senior positions throughout your company are well-positioned to recognise your achievements. Standing out from your peers with exceptional work will make sure that your sponsor comes to you. Remember to take on projects that go beyond your role, and ensure that people know about your accomplishments when you make them.

The more you accomplish the challenges you set for yourself in the workplace, the more you’ll attract sponsors. At the same time, however, you’ll also benefit from a greater chance of promotion, more self-confidence, and a stronger position in your workforce.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

 

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

IT Managers of the future

Traditionally IT managers had a crucial role to fill in an organisation. They were the people co-ordinating the computer and data information systems as well as integrating with the telephony systems. But with the introduction and wider adoption of cloud based computing, many aspects of IT manager roles are becoming obsolete.

Does this mean that the role of IT managers will become entirely redundant in the future? Already in the past six years there has been a steady decline in the number of IT Manager roles being advertised. Is this an indication of things to come and what can traditional IT managers do to ensure they have a future career?

The IT Sector is evolving, IT Managers should too

The basic truth is that the IT sector is fast paced and constantly evolving – it’s one of the aspects that makes it an exciting industry to be working in. IT managers need to be involved in more thanIT Managers just systems maintenance and engineering-style work, they need to be adding value to a business if they want to avoid becoming obsolete. This includes embracing new technologies and finding ways to adapt their skills so that they are moving the business forward and keeping up with trends. Fortunately the trends show many opportunities for forward thinking IT managers.

According to a study by the US Bureau of Labour Statistics, jobs in the IT sector are set to grow by 22% by 2020, but that growth will not necessarily be the same across all sectors in the industry.

IT Manager roles are set to increase by 18%, however, this will not be in traditional roles. Cloud computing is likely to shift these roles towards systems design and security rather than traditional management. The industries where there are likely to be the most opportunities are in healthcare and IT security.

Database Administrator jobs are predicted to increase by 31% as the need to process and disseminate ever increasing volumes of data continues to grow. To stay competitive, administrators will need to keep up to date on technology development and systems integration.

Computer Programming and Helpdesk Technical Support job opportunities may increase by 14% and 18% respectively. Although there is a trend for outsourcing these roles which means that it is becoming more competitive in the industry.

The roles that seem to hold the most promise are those of systems analysts and software developers which may increase by 22% and 30% respectively. Key areas of growth include mobile apps and systems software. Looking at these trends, how can IT managers improve their skills so that they can adapt with changing industry trends and ensure that they have long term career prospects?

Skills worth developing

The reality is that most IT Managers will need to adapt and start to specialise in one or two areas of expertise. Getting familiar with new technology and using existing expertise and knowledge to expand on the value they are providing to their employers. The next generation of IT professionals are highly agile and if IT Manager want to stay in those management roles, they need to have the same level, if not more knowledge than the people working for them in their teams. These are some of the top areas that IT Managers could consider developing skills in:

Cloud Computing – This is currently the leading technology trend in the industry and with it comes many opportunities. Think data security and transfer or integration; Systems design and management; Data mining skills and statistical analysis.

User Interface Design – With an increasing demand for personalisation in the customer experience, UI design will become increasingly important. Businesses are accumulating vast amounts of data and they want to be able to incorporate the findings from that data to improve the user interface and customer experience.

Data Security – Given the vast amounts of data being collected on customers, there is a concern of vulnerability. The EU recently outlined their new privacy regulations and this is likely to have an impact on the way organizations think about designing and maintaining their systems.

Data Science & Visualisation – Currently there is a massive shortage of skills in this field and as big data technology expands there is likely to be even more demand for skilled data scientists. Technical knowledge and an analytical mind is well suited to this field.

Mobile apps & Development Management – Mobile technology has been at the forefront technology developments in recent years and predictions are that this trend will continue. While app development is fairly established, key elements in the future will be how to integrate this will a better UI, data mining and integration with CRM systems.

Project Management – regardless of the area of specialisation, IT managers that are skilled in project management will find themselves in more demand. As more technologies develop, integration is going to become a challenge. IT Managers that have a broad knowledge base of different technologies plus sound project management skills can find themselves overseeing large implementation and integration projects.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Benefits NOT Features on your CV – “Make your USP stick.” (geddit?)

Sitting down to write your CV can be challenging, especially for tech people such as Salesforce Developers. After all data is your forte, not words. How do you get across your expertise without sounding like a robot? Here are some tips on how to make your USP stick and make your CV stand out from the pile of other Salesforce Developers on a recruiter’s desk.

Getting the basics right

Starting out, create a framework of headings ensure that you include all the important information such as skills, experience and accolades. Once completed, a CV should be on average 2 pages, maximum 3. Starting out it may be useful to write down a few bullet points under each heading. This can then be the core content that you use to develop your CV.

Anyone can create a frame work with basic facts, but that’s not what will sell you to a recruiters. To do this you need to start thinking like a marketer, what will make them choose you above everyone else? And the answer to this is fairly simple – what’s in it for them?

It’s not about you

Yes you heard right, your CV isn’t actually about you, the experienced Salesforce Developer, it’s about your potential employer. Yes it may feature all your skills and accolades, but unless you can Salesforce Developers CV Frustrationpresent all of that in a way that demonstrates a benefit to them, your CV holds no real value.

Let’s start by understanding the difference between a feature and a benefit. A feature is a skill, a form of experience, or a personality trait. For example: You have 8 years of experience working as a Salesforce Developer. That’s just a feature, there are lots of people that have many years’ worth of experience, that doesn’t mean they can do the job effectively.  You need to translate what those 8 years of experience mean for the company, what you achieved for the business in that time and how will your experience benefit them?

To write this in a way that demonstrates a future benefit to the potential employer, consider the following questions: How will your 8 years’ worth of experience save them money? How will it save them time? Will your systems knowledge increase sales or turnover or reduce overheads? Will your methodologies improve productivity? Will your management style improve team engagement and ensure that deadlines are met saving them money and building an industry reputation?

Ultimately you can have the most impressive list of accolades of any Salesforce Developer out there, but unless you make it clear how your particular skills and experience will benefit the company they won’t give your CV a second glance.

How to write benefits not features

Example of a feature sentence: Managed a 100+ person team dealing with integration points to third party products.

When you read that sentence what do you think? Does it make you sit up and say: “This is someone I want in my team?” or do you think: “That’s nice…..” The sentence is written as a feature, it tells what the person has done, it doesn’t translate into anything tangible that benefited the business and doesn’t tell the recruiter what the person can do for them if they were to be hired.

Now consider this same sentence written as a benefit: Managed a large (100+) team that created a number of product opportunities and business partnerships by integrating with third party applications and platforms.

See how different this is? When you read this sentence what do you pick up on? “This person created business partnerships – that could help me grow my business, that’s a benefit. They created a number of product opportunities too – that’s something my business needs. Plus they did this while managing a large team, so they must have good management skills and be a good team leader – that would be a definite benefit to my business.”

A CV with vision

Reading this sentence has the person thinking in terms of the future of their business and this is what you want to achieve with your CV as a Salesforce Developer. You want to communicate that you are the person that can take their business to the next level, help them gain market share or a competitive edge. You are the one that can help solve a problem they have been facing or help them to overcome industry challenges.  This is what will make them sit up and take notice of your CV and invite you in for an interview.

When creating your CV, think a little tech and a lot of sales and make everything about them. Every sentence must translate into: “This is what I can do and this is how it can benefit you!”

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.