Getting Major Bottleneck in line

Let me introduce you to Major Bottleneck. He is a hard task master, and a perfectionist. Which means everything has to go through him. Do you know this guy and does he exist within your Digital marketing recruitmentorganisation?

He does here at ROD……..He’s me!!!

I am that perfectionist that wants to have a handle on everything, almost all of the time, because it’s my business and I want to run it a certain way. This may sound logical and even admirable, but the problem is I’m only one person with a limited amount of time and energy and sometimes my need to be involved is more of hindrance than a help. Tasks that could be rolled out are held up because I insist they have to come through me and this causes a bottleneck. Here are three ways I’m learning to get Major Bottleneck back in line:

Solution 1 – Planning
Too often in the digital marketing recruitment industry we get bogged down in our day by attending to seemingly urgent but unimportant tasks and this happens easily when you don’t have a plan. Working according to a schedule or having a list of specific tasks that I need to complete within a given time frame helps me to stay on track. Even if I do have unexpected interruptions, when I have a plan it’s easier to pick up again where I left off and I’m much more productive.

Solution 2 – Delegation
Despite my need for control, I am discovering that sometimes it’s best to hand things over and delegate responsibility. It’s not that I can’t do the tasks, it’s simply that my time is better spent on strategic tasks that will build my clients build their digital marketing teams. It’s a case of asking the question “What is my time worth and where will it add the most value. What are the important tasks that only I can do and what does that leave that I can delegate to others?” After some careful consideration you’ll probably find that you can free up 30-50% of your time through delegation. Find people who have the right kind of expertise, such as digital marketing recruitment experts like Resource On Demand, who understand you and your business and then let them get on with the tasks.

Solution 3 – Partnering
Similar to delegation is partnering with other businesses who have specific expertise because it allows each business to focus on their core area of strength. This is especially true in the digital marketing recruitment industry. Of course it’s possible to recruit in house. But is this the best use of a managers time and will the digital marketing company be able to attract the right pool of candidates? Are projects stalling for a lack of having the right expertise? And could the solution be for cloud computing companies to partner with a digital marketing recruitment firm to provide them with the right kind of talent they need to grow their business effectively and keep projects on track?

Time is one commodity we can’t create more of, but we can start to use it wisely. Through planning, delegation and partnering businesses can start to work smarter and more efficiently. Then you can wave goodbye to major bottleneck and enjoy a more productive and profitable business.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Read For Success: 4 Reads for your Career

Following on from our previous Read for Success blogs, we take a look at Career Development – something every professional continuously strives for. These books offer up fantastic insight into how you can develop your career further.

The Profits Principles: The practical guide to building an extraordinary business around doing what you loveCareer Development

Easy-to-digest, a passion driven book for all business professionals looking to develop their career. Steven Briginshaw writes about the step by step processes to help turn your passion and love for what you do, into something sustainable, profitable and fun. Logical with a sense of confidence, this book hits the spot!

Who should read this book: aimed towards anyone and everyone looking to find the meaning of how to turn your career and business dreams into a reality.

This book has been rated: 5 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Career DevelopementThe Business of Sharing: Making it in the New Sharing Economy

With businesses rapidly expanding, we introduce this wonderful read for a budding entrepreneur. This book contains some personal anecdotes, often comical at times, from Alex Stephany about he’s personal experience getting to grips withing the sharing economy.

Who should read this book: those who want to learning  the importance of the growing economy.

This book has been rated: 5 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Eat That Frog!: Get More of the Important Things Done – Today! career development

A motivational read for anyone keen on successfully managing their time. The bite sized lessons contained in the book can be used in everyday work environment to help you manage your time better and approach projects more efficiently. It’s hard to believe that a self-help book can teach you techniques that you didn’t already know. And whilst some of these techniques can be obvious facts and standard clichés about telling yourself “You can do better”, Brian Tracy really proves he’s positive message works in this excellent motivational book.

Who should read this book: those who have hit a career barrier or looking for motivation for better time management within their career

 This book has been rated: 4.5 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Career DevelopmentOne Minute Salesperson

Whether you’ve just started in sales or you’re at the top of you game, the One Minute Salesperson cuts straight to the point. Simply put, be friendly and ask the right questions and you will sell. This is an excellent read with some great insights on how to solve management and business related problems.

Who should read this book: a salesperson in or going into managerial level looking to develop.

This book has been rated: 4.3 out of 5 stars by Amazon reviewers – buy this book now.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

How to Answer Those’s Really Tough Interview Questions

Enjoying a successful interview in today’s competitive technology job market can be a challenging feat. If you want to be prepared for your next interview, then you need to know how to answer the complex, questions your hiring manager is likely to ask the next time you apply for the job of a lifetime.  

Hiring managers aren’t picking complicated questions to stress you out or throw you off your game. Remember, like you’re looking for the perfect role, the company you’re interviewing with are looking for the ideal candidate. Those tough questions are your interviewer’s chance to get a deeper understanding of who you are, and what makes you a good fit for the organisation.  

Here, we’ll look at 5 tough interview questions, and how you can answer them.  

 

1. Questions About Co-workers: “How Did You Feel About Your Last Team?”

Most staff members won’t work in a silo, disconnected from the rest of the business. That means that when your hiring manager wants to see how you’ll work as part of a team, they’ll ask about your previous experiences with other employees. For instance, they might ask, “How did you feel about the people you worked with in your last role?” 

The key here is to stay away from negative answers. If you don’t have anything positive to say about your old coworkers, be honest and professional in your reply, such as: “We had a few debates on how individual projects should be handled; it’s natural I guess. I have always been a team player. In fact, on my last project I…” 

Emphasise how you developed your rapport building skills to connect with colleagues who communicated and worked in a different way to yourself.

Give examples of project teams that you were part of and what roles you had in the various teams
and what the outcomes of the projects were.

Remember that any interviewing manager knows that not everyone in a team will be ‘best friends’. What they are looking for is how you handle situations.

 

2. Questions About Failure: “Tell Me About a Time When You Didn’t Succeed”

During any interview experience, the hiring manager you speak to will want to assess your abilities, and how you’re going to impact the existing team, you are soon to be a part of. Though they’ll want to see examples of your achievements, and the things you might have accomplished in the past, they’ll also be interested in finding out how you respond to failure.  

No-one wins all the time.  

The key to being successful with your answers here is to think about how you can discuss what you learned from your mistakes. Explain how a previous situation went wrong, then tell your interviewer how you adapted to the experience, and what you’ve done to reduce the risk of similar problems occurring in the future. For instance, if you didn’t meet a deadline to implement a programme on time because a client was too vague with their specifications, you might have come up with a more intuitive way to ask for briefs from future customers.

 

3. Questions About Weakness: “Describe Your Biggest Flaw?”

This is another interview question that can be complicated and a challenge to answer. When you’re trying to make sure that you show your most “hireable” side to the business, it can seem counterproductive to highlight your flaws. However, with this question, your hiring manager is looking to see that you’re willing to accept your development areas and deal with them.  

Avoid telling your interviewer that you don’t have any shortcomings, or offer vague answers like “I’m a perfectionist”. Instead, be honest about the things that you’re not great at. Try to choose a something that isn’t going to be a deal breaker based on what you learned from the job description, then show the company that you’re currently focused on a process of self-development, intended to help you improve your skills and abilities.  

 

4. Questions About Motivation:

The purpose of an interview is for employers to understand more about candidates and how they will fit into the company culture as well as their fit for a role. A part of this will be finding out more about who you are, and what motivates you towards success.

Contrary to what many people think, salary isn’t the No 1 motivator. Yes, we all need it to support ourselves and families, and there is far more to this question.

The most common question you will be asked is “What motivates you?”, sometimes you may hear, “What’s important to you about the job you do and your career?”

This kind of question explore your “values”, and the interviewer is looking to see if your own personal values align with the values of the company you are applying to work for.

Examples of what motivates individuals are;  

  • Having interesting and meaningful work 
  • Being able to use their skills fully 
  • Opportunities to contribute outside their primary role responsibilities 
  • Development opportunities 
  • Working alone, or with others depending on the role 
  • Achieving goals 
  • Seeing a career pathway 
  • Personal and team recognition 
  • Having close working relationships with colleagues 
  • Flexible working opportunities 
  • Working with an inspiring manager 

While it can be easy to check out your prospective employer’s values on their website and
talk about things that relate to these values, if you don’t share these values
you are at risk of talking yourself into a role and company that you are likely to be unhappy in.

Be clear at the outset of any interview what is important to you about a new role and the company.

 

5. Questions about Goals: “Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years”

Most employers want to know that the people that they hire have ambitions and passion. In other words, have an idea of what you want to accomplish not just in general, but in the context of your potential new role within a team.

Think about where you’d like your career to go if you were offered the job, and what you could do to improve your chances of reaching your own personal career aspirations. For instance, if you’re hoping to be a team leader in three years, how are you going to make that a reality? 

Although there’s nothing wrong with talking about how the company in question could support you to achieve your goals; don’t make it sound like your future rests entirely on your new employer’s shoulders. It’s up to you to make sure you can drive your own career growth. 

The Easy Ways To Deal With Overwhelm At Work

The world of employment can be overwhelming and stressful sometimes – even if you love your job. We’re all dealing with many professional and personal pressures that make managing the chaos of everyday life increasingly complicated. When you combine your worries at home with impending project deadlines and uncooperative co-workers, it can feel as though succeeding in your business role is impossible.  

The good news is that you don’t simply have to “put up” with the stress. Rather than ignoring your feelings and pressing your nose further to the grindstone, it makes sense to create a strategy that might help you to reach your goals with fewer problems. Here, we’ll cover just some of the steps that you can take to banish overwhelm from your life, and regain control over your career.  

Have a Plan 

When it feels like you’ve got far too much to do, taking the time to step back and think strategically can seem a little counterproductive. However, planning could ensure that the rest of your time at work is far more efficient.  

Begin by writing down what you need to do for the day or the week, and figure out which order you should be completing tasks in. You’re sure to find some things more important than others, and this will help you to stop thinking about how you’re going to fit everything in.  

When you’re feeling overwhelmed, only stopping for a second and taking the opportunity to breathe and evaluate can give you a lot of much-needed power over the situation. Remember to prioritise your tasks, and accomplish them one at a time. Multitasking is never an effective way to get things done. 

Give Yourself a Break 

Stress can be a huge detriment to your work life. When you’re spending all of your time in the office panicking about what you need to get done, you don’t have any space left to focus on the challenges at hand. Stress closes the creative part of the brain, damages our cognitive processes, and even disrupts our perception of time, so we feel like we’re losing minutes faster.  

Although it’s hard to tear yourself away from your desk while the demands are piling up, taking some time out to relax can be an excellent way to lighten the burden. While it’s tempting to work without breaks, the reality is that you can only accomplish so much before your brain needs a little rest and rejuvenation.  

If nothing else, spend about five minutes walking around the outside of your building. The fresh air can do wonders for clearing your head and reducing your anxiety levels.  

Speak to Someone 

Sometimes, all you need to do to help yourself cope with a stressful professional situation is to say your concerns out loud. Speak to someone about the issues you’re facing, and see whether their input can give you a new perspective on the problems at hand.  

Ideally, you’ll want to talk to someone  who will only listen to whatever you have to say. Sometimes, the ideal partner will be a co-worker, who knows exactly what it’s like to deal with similar problems in your industry. In other circumstances, you might even feel comfortable talking to your manager about the problems you’re having, and the things you might need help handling.  

If you do decide to speak to your line manager, make sure that you don’t come across as though you’re complaining about too much responsibility. Instead, say something like: “I feel like I have a lot to cope with right now, and was wondering if you had any guidance on how to tackle it all?” 

Look After Yourself 

It’s hard to produce your best work if you’re not caring for your mind and body. A lot of people who feel overwhelmed at work end up pushing themselves to work constant twelve-hour days or continuing to work on projects at the weekend because they feel they have too much to do; unfortunately, this rarely ends well.  

If you’re sitting in front of your computer, too exhausted to concentrate, and too stressed to sleep, then you’re still not accomplishing anything positive. When you’re tired, you’re more likely to procrastinate. At the same time, exhaustion makes your worries feel bigger and more significant than they really are; which can lead into sending yourself into “panic” mode.  

Give yourself some rest, and make sure that you get minimum hours of sleep every night – no matter how much work you have to do.

 

Know Your Triggers 

Finally, when you’re feeling overwhelmed with your professional role, it’s important to know exactly which factors are pushing you to the brink. For instance, do you feel like you’re getting too many assignments to handle, or is your boss making you feel overly pressured? If you know what causes the brunt of your concern, you can begin to act and fight back against your nerves.  

Keep a journal of your thoughts and feelings to help pinpoint which issues could be causing your unhappy feelings. Once you’ve figured out what’s affecting your mood, you’ll be able to speak to your boss about changes you need to make.  

 

About Resource On Demand 

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations in growing their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs. 

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 (0)20 8123 7769 

Manager Vs Leader; Which Are You?

The terms “manager” and “leader” are often used interchangeably, but the truth is that they describe very different roles. Although both managers and leaders often stand at the head of an organisation and direct the path that a company takes, their attitudes and approaches are entirely different.   

While a manager could be someone who teaches their employees what the future of a business should look like, and how they can achieve specific goals, a leader is someone who creates a vision of success and inspires their team to connect and engage with the idea.

As a result, their team will want to follow, and in doing so, they will be committed to facing and overcoming whatever obstacles, they face as well as any uncertainties and risks.  

Often, a distinction is made in which management means “doing things right”, while leadership involves “doing the right things”.  While most people will share the characteristics of both great leaders and great managers, the following differences could help you establish which you are today and which you may prefer to be.  

1. Vision Vs Strategy

A leader is typically someone who thinks more about the “big picture” for a team, brand, or company, rather than focusing on which systems and processes will be needed to realise the vision.

Leaders outline the direction of the route they want to take and communicate the goals and milestones that need to be achieved along the way. Then they empower their teams and give them the freedom to achieve the goals. These professionals know what they want to accomplish, and believe in the ability of their team members to find the best path to success.  

Alternatively, managers focus more on what needs doing, what systems and processes are used and if they are being utilised in the ‘right way’. You could say that managers focus on managing ‘things’ rather than people.

Leaders consider the overall vision to be the most important factor in success, while managers concentrate on the details of how to bring that vision to life. The reality is an organisation requires
both.  

A great leader relies on imagination and creativity intended to motivate a group of employees towards a shared ambition. A manager looks at what worked for them in the past and builds a strategy based on numbers, data, and measurable results; specifying exactly what needs to be completed to reach a goal. One doesn’t work without the other. Often, however, individuals have a natural preference for one of these roles. Both can also be learnt.  

2. Growth Vs Sustainability

When a manager thinks about how they can be successful, they’re often concerned with devising a plan to sustain whatever they’re managing. They are inclined to look for the best ways to keep a system working for as long as possible. While they may look for improvements, a leader is more likely to look for change and innovation. The latter provides greater opportunity for development and growth, both of systems and people.   

A leader is more willing to take risks because they know the only way to evolve, is to change, they  inspire others to do the same.

 

3. People Vs Systems 

A great manager knows how to create a system for success. They evaluate the strategies used in the past to make informed decisions about the future. Managers not only put the right systems into place for exceptional results, but they also know how to get the right employees involved within that system too – delegating tasks to the people with the most appropriate skills.  

By focusing on the people behind the work, managers can access an incredible amount of knowledge that’s impossible to achieve with a company handbook. While managers are crucial to organisational success, a leader recognises what it takes to motivate people, inspire change, and encourage action. 

4. Courage Vs Discipline

As we have already mentioned, a manager tends to be more risk averse their focus is on bringing a strategy to life by following using systems, processes and guidelines. They keep individuals in their team on track and make sure that everything comes together as planned. They often have an attention to detail and can monitor progress ensuring deadlines are met. 

Contrastingly, a leader’s life is often filled with risk and uncertainty. Leaders make decisions based on educated risks when planning what’s next for the business and team. Sometimes this can involve setting a course that takes the company and team into uncharted waters.

To shoulder such decisions, taking both responsibility and accountability requires courage. Generally,
leaders have a plentiful supply of it.   

 

About Resource on Demand 

Resource on Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations in growing their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs. 

The team at Resource on Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 (0)20 8123 7769 

5 Reasons Why Your Best Candidate Said, “No Thanks”

The race for the perfect recruit is on. As companies in the technology industry struggle to find the perfect combination of skills and characteristics in their ideal employee, the recruitment experience is growing more complex than ever.  

It’s not an employer’s market anymore.  

Tech specialists have their pick of countless new job opportunities today, which means they have the luxury of being able to choose the right work environment, the ideal title, and the best perks.  

In a world where candidates reject up to 50% of all job offers, it’s time for businesses to start thinking about how they can refine the hiring process, and improve their chances of attracting the perfect employee. Since the best way to improve is to learn from past mistakes, we’re going to look at 5 of the top reasons why your ideal applicant might say “no thanks” to your career opportunity.
 

1. The Recruitment Process Took Too Long

Tracking down the right team member is a huge challenge. You might spend months evaluating your business needs, working out which roles need to be filled the fastest, and thinking about how you’re going to advertise yourself.  

Unfortunately, the longer your recruitment process is, the more you could risk losing the attention and interest of your candidates. Remember, they’re on the hunt for the perfect job, which means they don’t have time to sit and wait months for an interview.  

Try to follow up with the individuals in your applicant pool that have the most potential as quickly as possible. Even if you simply send out a quick email telling them that they’ve made it to the “consideration stage”, you could reduce the chances that they go out and actively search for an alternative employer.  

When you’re struggling to fill the gaps in your company, it’s easy to forget that potential employees have deadlines to think about too. A lengthy recruitment process could make your candidates feel like you don’t respect their time, or even cause your organisation to appear disorganised. Consider working with a specialist salesforce.com recruitment agency to help streamline the process, and keep wasted time to a minimum.
 

2. Your Employer Brand Lacks Appeal 

Businesses often spend a lot of time worrying about how their brand looks to prospective customers. However, you might not spend as much effort thinking about how you look to future team members. Your “employer brand”, is how you highlight what it’s like to work with, or for your organisation. It involves everything from your reviews on individual hiring websites like Glassdoor, to the way your employees talk about your business online.  

Your existing staff can easily give away hints on what it’s like to be employed by your business. If they’re happy, then it’ll show in their social media posts and the way they interact with customers. On the other hand, if your hires are unhappy, then that will show too, in everything from high turnover rates, to grumpy teams.  

As brands grow more aware of things like “corporate culture“, technology experts are searching for careers that offer excellent salaries, room for growth, and a welcoming internal experience. Remember, every candidate you interview will be hoping to work with a team that provides happiness and satisfaction.
 

3. You Didn’t “Sell” The Opportunity Enough

Businesses often forget that interviews are a two-way street. While employers need to evaluate each applicant carefully and consider which factors are most important to their business, potential team members will also be thinking about how the role in question will satisfy their personal and professional needs.  

It’s not only the candidate that needs to sell themselves in a job interview but the business too. You need to show new people how they will be appreciated in your organisation, and what you’re going to do to give them an experience that couldn’t be matched by other businesses in your industry.  

A specialist recruitment agency can help you to craft a job description that appeals to your ideal employee, but it’s up to you to show off the best parts of your brand when the opportunity comes knocking. Think about interview body language, how you can highlight the potential for future growth, and what you’ll need to do to draw attention to employee perks.
 

4. There Aren’t Enough Opportunities for Development 

Growth is something that every recruit wants. While salary and work environment are important, it’s also crucial for businesses to think about how they can underline development opportunities for their job candidates.  

In a recent poll, 87% of millennials noted that advancement was critical to accepting a new role. When today’s employees are happy with the career progress available for them, they’re more likely to choose and stay with a company.  

On the other hand, a member of staff who feels like they’re stagnating in their role will be more likely to browse for alternate employment opportunities. That’s why it’s essential for growing organisations to assist team members with ways of improving their knowledge and skills.

If you demonstrate your potential new hire that there’s future in your company, then you’ll have a better chance of securing that all-important “yes”.
 

5. Problems with Remuneration and Benefits 

Finally, your salary and benefits package can go a long way towards deciding whether you’re going to secure the perfect applicant or not. While choosing a remuneration package can be a challenging experience for employers, it’s important to make sure that you select something that appeals to your ideal candidates, and compels them to join your team.  

Remember to think beyond the initial salary, and consider extra benefits like flexible working hours, remote working, and even medical or life insurance when you’re trying to earn the attention of technology talent.  

If you’re struggling, consider speaking to a recruitment group about the specific salary trends and requirements of your industry. These professionals could help you to pinpoint the benefits that put you one step ahead of the competition when hiring the best staff.  

 

About Resource on Demand 

Resource on Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations in growing their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs. 

The team at Resource on Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 (0)20 8123 7769 

What Future Job Skills will be needed to survive in a Machine automated world?

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are the buzzwords of the moment. We hear about self-driving cars and a world of automation where chatbots run call centres and respond to customer queries. Much of this technology is new to the marketplace, but predictions are that these are only the start of things to come. So where does that leave people just entering the job market? What future career prospects will our children have, and how can we prepare them to have the future job skills needed to survive in a machine dominated future?

The difference between Humans and Machines

There are many things that machines can do much better than humans, like search vast volumes of data and make mathematical calculations. But their abilities are governed by one major factor – rules. Machines work on programming and predictive learning based on historical data. If new factors come into to the mix, they are ill equipped to manage them.

Humans on the other hand are highly adaptable and can apply knowledge creatively to find solutions to new problems. This type of problem solving ability is what will be the key to humans continuing to add value in the workplace. As much as we’d like to think modern lifestyles are easy to control, plan for and schedule, there remains a high level of unpredictability to life. In addition there are many work sectors in which it will be hard to replace humans with machines. These are the things to be taken into consideration when teaching our children future job skills.

Future Job Skills lie in Human Value:
There are several types of jobs that require strong interpersonal skills and this is not something that machines can’t easily mimic. Think of social professions such as psychology or emergency services, for example.

In the event of an accident, natural disaster or fire, no one can fully understand the situation until they arrive on scene. Additionally as the situation unfolds, circumstances can change. Patients may respond well to treatment or not, what was a stable and safe environment on arrival can quickly become unsafe. Only humans can effectively manage such circumstances because they have the knowledge and instinct to be able to make decisions and adapt according to the circumstances. This highlights an important future job skill: The ability to think on your feet and adapt knowledge and decision making to changing circumstances.

A second important future job skill is visualisation and planning – the ability to create perspective, design, create and coordinate ideas so that they become reality. Architects, engineers, even graphic designers and advertising agencies require human creativity and this is a skill worth developing. Machines may be able to take over many tasks, but it is still human thinking that envisioned them doing that in the first place. Creativity, design, and engineering are important future job skills that humans do best.

Nature and nurture – there is a limit to how much we (or machines) can control the natural world and because of that there will always be opportunities for humans to step in and make a Future job skillsdifference. The environment remains constantly in flux. One only has to view the ever changing weather patterns to see that. As much as we’d like to use equipment to predict what will happen, in the end, nature remains unpredictably in control.

Careers involved in the environmental sector will rely on human expertise from conservation, through to legal management and control as well as the field of medicine. Despite advances, new bugs and diseases consistently appear and old viruses re-emerge, stronger than ever. The human body responds individually to treatments with emotional and mental influences proving to be just as important as physiological factors. As a result, humans will remain valuable in the field of natural sciences. Related future job skills may include scientific knowledge and study, social skills, legal skills as well as management and understanding all varieties of interlinked ecosystems.

Business and economics is another field that remains largely unpredictable. While markets may be manipulated and influenced, consumers react of their own accord, and because they are human the outcomes can never truly be certain. Take last year’s Brexit vote for example. Nobody thought the result would be “no”, and economic predictions based on that result were ominous. Yet many of those fears have proven to be unfounded. While certain sectors took a knock, others have shown to be resilient, growing exponentially despite conservative economic movements. Business thinking, particularly in the entrepreneurial realm will remain important future job skills, as well as that of managers, analysts and economists.

In the future there will be many opportunities to work with machines to achieve better outcomes, and there will also be careers and areas of expertise that will remain firmly in human hands. Rather than fear machines and the impact they may have, the most important future job skills may involve using instinctive human potential to think creatively and seek out opportunities even where there appear to only be challenges.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Take control of your own Personal Development

As new generations enter the workforce, many jobseekers look for work opportunities in companies that will help with their own personal development. But whose responsibility is this really? Is itHuman Capital Management personal development up to employers to provide training or should individuals be taking the initiative if they want to progress in their career?

In terms of Human Capital Management, business are recognising that they do have an important role to play. When they invest in their staff and create a stimulating work environment, it helps to reduce attrition and increases employee engagement which often results in greater productivity. This helps them to retain and develop top talent that contributes to the company success. So it is in a company’s interests to provide training and career development opportunities.

The Development Dilemma

The problem is that often employees will complete the training and gain the benefit from it and then move on elsewhere, so the money and time invested in those employees is benefiting someone else and not the company who provided the training. This dilemma results in companies being selective on who they provide training to, often choosing to invest in employees that show themselves to be proactive and interested in adding more value to the business as well as their own personal development.

One method that companies are in investing in terms of human capital management is gamification. This incorporates self-directed learning into a gaming type platform. It allows employees to create their own persona online, register for and complete training in their own time and gain recognition for their efforts. It’s proving to be a valuable tool because those employees that are really invested in personal development have the opportunity to complete additional training modules and further their own knowledge while at the same time encouraging others to do the same by their example.

But what if the company you work for does not provide these opportunities, or limits them to a select few senior staff? How can you progress in your personal development so that you’re consistently building your career? Here are our top 3 tips:

Set Goals and Objectives

Give some thought as to where you want to me in the short, medium and long term. What type of Human Capital Management role to do you see yourself fulfilling in 5-10 year’s time or by the end of the year? What are the stepping stones to get there? What skills or type of experience will you need and how can you accomplish that?

Asking these questions will help you set clear goals and personal objectives. Remember too, the golden rules of goal setting: Goals should be specific, measurable, action-oriented, reasonable and time-based. Start with weekly goals, setting milestones that are a starting point to reach your long term human capital management goals.

Breaking bigger goals into bite sized chunks not only helps to keep you on track, it’s also extremely rewarding to tick off tasks. It gives you a sense of accomplishment which encourages you to keep moving towards your bigger personal development goals.

Coaching and Mentoring

Find someone who can mentor you and don’t underestimate the value of this. If you have some budget available you may want to invest in a personal or business coach. However, keep in mind that this is the type of relationship that will develop over time and could get quite costly if you choose to have regular weekly or monthly meet up sessions. A coach is someone who is trained (and certified) to help guide you in making decisions and helping you uncover what’s most important to you so that you can then direct your personal development efforts into specific areas of your life.

Mentoring on the other hand may be offered free of charge in an organisation or on an industry forum. This is where more senior people freely give of their time and input and are there to listen to your questions and provide advice based on their personal experience. This could be a senior colleague, manager or even director in the firm.

Keep in mind that a mentor needn’t be someone you meet with in person. You could connect with someone in your industry online and have video chats as mentoring sessions, or have a set up where you can communicate over email or chat.

Finally, there is also the option of reading inspirational stories and books by leading business and industry personalities. These books can provide valuable insights on how they achieved success that you can incorporate into your personal development and goal setting.

Beat the Imposter Phenomenon

Many people don’t progress in their careers, not because they don’t have the skills and abilities, but rather because they don’t believe in themselves. They live with a sense that they’re an imposter and soon someone will find out that they aren’t all they’re supposed to be. Part of personal development is recognising your skills and value you can contribute to a business. Believe in yourself and that you’re worth investing in, because if you do, others will too.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

So…tell me about yourself?

Jobseekers talking about themselvesIt may seem an obvious question for an interview but it’s one that most jobseekers dread. “What should I share? How much should I share? If I talk about myself too much I may come across as arrogant. If I don’t share enough they will think I lack confidence.”

I’m often surprised how unprepared jobseekers are for this question. Maybe because it is so broad and they aren’t quite sure where to start. So here’s my tip: Think marketing. Think of yourself as a product that you need to present in a way that makes the other person sit up and think “Hey that’s exactly what I need!”

Here are some marketing questions to help you prepare your answers:

Who am I? (Personality)
Often personality is as much a factor as skills or experience in finding the person that is the right fit for a team. With this question you want to be sharing your values and what’s important to you. Things like being a good team member or leader, someone who likes to creatively solve problems or enjoys collaborating. Think about what the interviewer might be looking for in a jobseeker and align that with your strongest personality traits.

What is my experience? (Background)
Your past work and life experience creates a backdrop for the rest of your marketing story. This is where you can highlight key projects you worked on and what you enjoyed most about them. Be sure to highlight specific challenges faced and how they were overcome. Travel, hobbies and interests can also be featured here as they will provide a broader view of your life experience.

What am I good at? (Features)
As a jobseeker you need to showcase what you can do in terms of specific skills so that the interviewer can tick the boxes if you align with what they are looking for. Be specific and link your skills to your experience to demonstrate that you really do know what you’re talking about.

What have I achieved? (Benefits)
For every skill or feature you list about yourself, link it to a benefit for the employer – either past or future. For example: “By streamlining the project rollout, implementation was achieved in 3 months instead of 5 months saving the company X amount in implementation costs.” Always think in terms of: “What’s in it for them?” because this is what will get their attention.

What do I want? (Mutual benefits)
Interviewers are interested in what jobseekers are looking for because this is a big factor in how long they will stay with the company. Be honest in your expectations, but make sure they are grounded in reality. Link your expectations into why you applied for the position and want to work for the company. If you show that you are sold on the company and eager to contribute you are already half way into marketing yourself into the job.

As a final tip, keep in mind the perspective of the interviewer and market yourself to them. (What are they looking for, what do they want?) This will help prevent you getting too self-conscious when trying to talk about yourself. Put yourself forward as not just a jobseeker, but someone they really can’t afford to be without.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.

Are Longer Notice Periods a Good Thing?

Recently we have seen a trend towards longer notice periods. In particular in the IT Workday industry the norm has become 3 months. But not everyone in the industry is convinced that this is a Workday Notice Periodgood thing. Indeed for both employers and employees there are pros and cons which could affect not only the working relationship but also the business concerned.

The Employers Perspective

With systems like Workday, high level expertise can be hard to find. Which means that employers want to try hold on to that expertise as long as possible and have sufficient time to search for a replacement if an employee decides to leave. Generally it can take three months or more to find someone suitable. Then there is also the question of handover. This is not something that can be done in a week or two so from an employer’s perspective a notice period of three months or more is the minimum they would need to ensure continuity in business projects.

However, this can also present challenges. Once a Workday employee has made a decision to leave they tend to emotionally disconnect. This often reflects in their work and interactions with clients and colleagues. Instead of just causing a disruption in workflow it can also cause a decline in morale which could in some instances instigate a mass exodus in the team, especially if the person leaving has a fair amount of influence or is looked up to by colleagues. This could be far more damaging to the business than losing the expertise of just that one Workday person.
Sometimes, despite how valuable a person is in the role they fulfill, it may be in the business’ best interests to get them out as soon as possible, rather than let them stay on. This is particularly important when there is a chance the employee could take client accounts with them to a competitor or be looking at starting up their own enterprise.

The Employees Perspective

Some employees want to leave on good terms and give their Workday employers the benefit of the doubt by working out a full three month notice period. They recognize the complexities involved in projects and are willing to work the full notice period in order to help train up their replacement and conduct a proper handover.

Sometimes employees are even willing to give more notice than required. However, they need to be cautious. If the Workday employer thinks they don’t need the extra notice they can terminate with just the required notice period and employee could then find themselves without pay for a month or two before they start their new job. There is also the challenge of coordinating start dates with a new employer and ensuring they’d be willing to wait for three months or more.

Ultimately it will come down to the Workday employment contract and the relationship between the employer and employee. It’s always best to leave on good terms as one never knows when past relationships could impact business dealings or opportunities in the future. With open communications and good working relationships, it is possible to have a positive outcome for all.

Resource On Demand is Europe’s first specialist Salesforce Recruitment Company. We assist the world’s leading organisations to grow their technology teams. Supporting companies to fill roles that span across digital marketing, marketing automation, Human Capital Management, CRM system management and, Salesforce developer, Salesforce consultant and Salesforce admin jobs.

The team at Resource On Demand have access to an extensive database of key talent, registering over 8000 professionals each year. To find out how we can support you call us on +44 20 8123 7769 or rod@resourceondemand.com.